100 Hot Cars

Just Car Blog

Amazing New Fiat Ad 17
Jul
Posted by Kelly Levinsohn in Auto Advertising, Fiat, Fiat 500 Abarth, Popular, Videos on 07 17th, 2013

Fiat Abarth Cabrio

The latest advertisement for the 2013 Fiat 500 Abrath Cabrio is clever, beautiful and sure to grab your attention!

The ad was shot to be featured in ESPN Magazine’s ‘Body Issue’. The concept of a ‘Body Issue’ was conceived to, according to the magazine, “admire the vast potential of the human form,” and to “unapologetically stand in awe of the athletes who’ve pushed their physiques to profound frontiers”

We can imagine that creating and shooting this ad was no easy task. Precision and intense focus must have been the order of the day.

All of the women who appear in this advert were specifically chosen for their bodies and unique athletic and gymnastic abilities. Obviously, the women had to be strong to be able to hold certain positions for hours at a time.

The hours of posing and planning was definitely worth it, as the end result was mid-blowing. The marketing team really did an outstanding job with the concept and it was executed wonderfully.

A Fiat made from beautiful women – now isn’t that any man’s dream?

Check out the video below to see the behind the scenes process:

Source: Automobile



Nurburgring in the USA: Car and Driver Intros 2013 Lightning Lap Contenders at VIR – Video 24
Jan
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in 2012 Camaro ZL1, 2012 Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG Coupe Black Series, 2013 Camaro 1LE, audi, Audi RS5, Audi S6, Automotive, BMW, BMW 335i, BMW M5, BMW M6, Caprice, Car and Driver, Chevrolet, Dodge, Dodge Charger, Editorial, Ferrari, ferrari 458 italia, Fiat, Fiat 500 Abarth, Ford, Ford Focus ST, Ford Shelby GT500, Hyundai, Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Jaguar, Jaguar XKRS, LEXUS, Lexus LFA, Mercedes Benz, Mercedes Benz C63 AMG, porsche, Porsche-911, Shelby, Subaru, Subaru BRZ, video, VIR on 01 24th, 2013
car-and-driver-lightning-lap

car-and-driver-lightning-lap

Ever since lap times at the Nurburgring became a benchmark for a vehicle’s over-all performance, there has been a need to find a ‘benchmark’ track in the USA. Car and Driver, along with many other enthusiasts, think we already have such a track, the Virginia International Raceway (VIR).

Virginia International Raceway seems to be the ideal choice for testing a vehicle’s over-all performance dynamics. With the elevation changes, the Grand West Course’s 4.1 miles, 28 turns and proven effectiveness to challenge experienced race car drivers, VIR is the ideal home-grown Nurburgring. Car and Driver sets out to VIR for their Lightning Lap annual track torture test and brings us the official preview to the dueling test along with a run-down of the contenders. Enjoy the video below!



The Fiat 500 Abarth At The Targa Newfoundland: Video 31
Oct
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Fiat, Fiat 500 Abarth, Kurt, Targa Newfoundland, video on 10 31st, 2012

Now that we’ve run One Lap of America, the next motorsport event on our bucket list is the Targa Newfoundland. Essentially a series of stage races on closed public roads in Newfoundland, Canada, the race is renown for its challenging drives, spectacular scenery and warm hospitality. In fact, the only thing preventing us from running it in 2013 is our appalling lack of budget.

Until we hit the lottery, you’ll have to make do with this video of pro-drifter turned rally driver Samuel Hubinette, running the Targa Newfoundland with co-driver Jen Horsey in a Fiat 500 Abarth. According to Brandt Rosenbusch, Abarth Racing Team manager, the 500 Abarth entered was prepped for competition by gutting the interior, adding a roll cage, bolting in racing seats and harnesses, then adding a coilover suspension. While the car likely wasn’t the fastest in its category, we’re sure it was competitive.

The basic race is five days and covers some 2,200 kilometers (1,367 miles), but just getting to Newfoundland takes a serious amount of driving (or flying, if you’ve got the budget to have your race car hauled there). It’s run regardless of weather, which happened to include a hurricane during this year’s race; in other words, competitors really do need to be prepared for any eventuality.

It looks like Fiat is producing several videos from its experience at the 2012 Targa Newfoundland, so we’ll bring you the others as soon as Fiat puts them up.



2012 Fiat 500 Abarth Review & Test Drive 20
Sep
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth, Automotive, featured, Fiat, Fiat 500, Fiat 500 Abarth, Test Drives on 09 20th, 2012

The new 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth has finally made its way to our American shores. Having had the opportunity to review the new Fiat 500 Sport and now the new performance oriented Abarth version, I can now elaborate on the stark contrast in driving characteristics and handling of the two.

The new 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth pays homage to European enthusiasts who simply wanted long past generations of Fiat vehicles to go faster. The legendary Karl Abarth was obliged to make that happen. Abarth is not so much of a household name in America but among the enthusiast community it simply means a turbocharged 160 horsepower Fiat 500 with track-tuned sport suspension, better brakes, an ESP (electronic stability program) that can be fully disabled and up-rated exterior/interior aesthetics.

The new 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth is everything enthusiasts yearned for in the current sappy-performance Fiat 500. Now, rising from the ashes, the legend of Karl Abarth lives on in the new 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth.

Having spent a good amount of time in the new Fiat Abarth and taking it to a few car shows, it was interesting to hear onlookers and inquisitive minds give me their fair share of questions about this new little pocket rocket from the Italians. With a 1.4-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder Mulitair engine good for 160 horsepower and 170 lb-ft of torque spun through a 5-speed manual transmission to the front wheels, the 2,533 pound Fiat 500 Abarth can scoot to 60 mph in just under 7 seconds. That is about 3 second faster than the normal Fiat 500 if you are taking note. The Abarth is able to have this performance and serve up an estimated 28 mpg in the city and 34 mpg on the highway.

The driving experience of the Fiat 500 Abarth is rather entertaining. The distinctive exhaust note is almost enough by itself to keep your ears at bay without turning on the surprisingly decent-sounding stereo system. The sounds coming out of the dual tipped exhaust system is surly to disturb your neighbors every time you start it up. The turbo spool is noticeable, too -especially when you are near idle. Push the Abarth to redline and slap it into the next gear, you just might get some audible feedback in the form of a faint backfire, which is absolutely cool. Of course the Fiat Abarth doesn’t give you near as much snap crackle and pop as something like the MINI Cooper S Coupe, but you will have fun exhausting copious amounts of un-spent fuel. The shifter makes way for quick shifts but tends to feel much like a butter box instead of anything direct as beefed-up sports-car gear box.

When I wasn’t looking at the boost gauge needle nearing 18 PSI, I was more focused on my surroundings to put the handling dynamics of the tall-looking Fiat Abarth to the test. Although it looks to have a high center of gravity, the Abarth proves to be surprisingly rewarding on twisty roads. For obvious reasons, the Fiat is nimble and tends to handle well through turns thanks in part to a track-focused suspension and sitting about 15 millimeters closer to the ground than a normal Fiat 500. Not to mention, the larger but optional 17-inch painted wheels and wider 205/40-series Pirelli PZero Nero tires all add to the hot-hatch’s lateral grip.

A Sport mode, set through a dashboard button, greatly improves throttle response and tightens up the steering while speeding up the steering rack at the same time. Turning traction and stability control off by holding the ESP button for a few seconds will allow you to light up the front wheels taking onlookers by surprise. Torque steer is kept to a minimum. Of course that is because the wheel-spin is managed through a Torque Transfer Control (TTC) system, which is essentially an open differential and computer-actuated front brakes to redirect torque. No mechanical limited-slip is offered. Keeping the Fiat 500 Abarth in a straight line can sometimes be a challenge when it catches grooves in the road or during heavy braking. Weight is distributed to 64% on the front axle and 36% rear, keeping it shy of being balanced driver’s car.

Heavy braking, once again, is a faint reminder of the Fiat 500 Abarth’s short 90-inch wheelbase. Although the brakes are larger in the Abarth than a normal Fiat 500, the vehicle tends to have an elusive sway in different directions when ABS starts to kick in. Stopping distances have been recorded at 123 feet from 60 mph, slightly more than the Mini Cooper S’ 115 feet.

Inside of the new Fiat 500 Abarth is an interior layout familiar to that of the normal 500. Where the Abarth version takes a different approach is the thick leather-wrapped flat-bottom steering wheel and sportier seats. The front seats, although a different variation than ones on the Fiat 500, lack the proper bolstering to match the Abarth’s handling abilities. Moreover, finding a good seating position takes an act of congress somewhat due to the steering wheel being slightly off-centered from the driver’s seating perspective. The console shifter is somewhat of a reach with it being mounted on the console. Never mind the buttery feeling of the shifter, the large size alone will feel like you are adjusting the throttle on the Titanic.

The Fiat Abarth comes with a host of standard features that you would expect from vehicles costing well under $20,000. Though, the starting price of the Abarth is $22,000 and can be optioned out with leather-trimmed seats, a safety and convenience package including auto-temp climate control/SiriusXM Satellite Radio/Security system, 17-inch forged painted and painted wheels and a removable/portable TomTom GPS navigation unit mounted through a top-dashboard port. With all of these options, as found on my 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth test vehicle, the price climbs to $26,200 including a $700 destination charge. As a comparison, a Mini Cooper S Hatchback starts at $23,100 and can rack up a much larger bill than the Abarth when the options start piling on.

2012-fiat-500-abarth
2012-fiat-500-abarth-drive
2012-fiat-500-abarth-wheel-tire
2012-fiat-500-abarth-front
2012-fiat-500-abarth-side
2012-fiat-500-abarth-rear
2012-fiat-500-abarth-rear-2
2012-fiat-500-abarth-dashboard
2012-fiat-500-abarth-gauge-cluster
2012-fiat-500-abarth-front-seats
2012-fiat-500-abarth-door-trim
2012-fiat-500-abarth-shifter
2012-fiat-500-abarth-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Fiat 500 Abarth $22,000 /Fiat 500 Abarth As-Tested $26,200
  • Engine: 1.4-liter turbocharged Multiair 4-cylinder 160 horsepower @ 5500 rpm / 170 ft-lbs. torque @ 2500 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 90.6in.
  • Total length: 144.4in.
  • Total width: 64.1in.
  • Total height: 59.2in.
  • Track: f/r-55.4/55.0in.
  • Ground clearance: 4.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-38.9/35.6.in.
  • Legroom: f/r-40.7/31.7in.
  • Fuel tank: 10.5 gallons
  • Turning circle: 37.6ft.
  • Interior volume: 85.1cu.ft.
  • Curb weight: 2,533lbs.
  • 0-60mph: 6.9 seconds
  • EPA mileage: 28mpg/city, 34mpg/highway


Fiat Campaigning 500 Abarth In This Year’s Targa Newfoundland: Video 10
Sep
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Fiat, Fiat 500 Abarth, Kurt, News, Targa Newfoundland, video on 09 10th, 2012

Samuel Hubinette is probably best known for driving his Formula Drift Dodge Challenger sideways through a corner in a cloud of tire smoke, but that doesn’t mean the Swedish driver is incapable of going fast in a front drive car, too. To prove it, Fiat is having Hubinette and co-driver Jen Horsey run this year’s Targa Newfoundland in a specially-prepared Fiat 500 Abarth.

The Targa Newfoundland is a six-day event that allows drivers of both vintage and contemporary sports cars to test themselves against the clock on the roads of Newfoundland, Canada. The six-stage (counting the prologue) event covers some 1,400 miles of both paved and gravel roads, ensuring that competitors have the opportunity to put all their car control skills to the test.

To win, Hubinette and Horsey will need to deliver the lowest time for each stage, beating the established time for their class by the largest margin (with the lowest amount of accumulated penalties). Hubinette isn’t the only Chrysler employee to run the race, either: Ralph Gilles, head of the SRT division, has run the event several times in the past.







 Category



 Blogroll