100 Hot Cars

Just Car Blog

2013 Scion FR-S – Second Look Test Drive 1
Nov
Posted by Harvey Schwartz in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, featured, Scion, Scion FR-S, Test Drives on 11 1st, 2012

When I think of Toyota’s Scion division I always think of inexpensive, low-end vehicles priced and engineered for urban dwellers looking for affordable, front-wheel drive, small-compact, high-mileage vehicles such as the xB, tC, and iQ.  Well, Scion has turned the corner on those other models with the introduction of the all-new FR-S rear-wheel drive sports car.  Scions usual cues of affordability and compact size are still a hallmark of the all-new FR-S but this is no ordinary Scion as this fifth model to join the Scion family is its ‘halo’ car.

The FR-S provides the automotive landscape with an authentic sports car at an affordable price of admission with a MSRP of just $24,200 when equipped with a six-speed manual transmission, and $25,300 when equipped with the outrageous six-speed automatic that features paddle shifters and Dynamic Rev Management technology.

The FR-S, which stands for Front-engine, Rear-wheel, Sport; is Scion’s definition of an authentic rear-wheel-drive sports car with exceptionally balanced performance and handling , compelling style, flexible utility and surprisingly good fuel mileage.

The FR-S is a true ‘Scion, born into a lengthy history of Toyota performance cars and motorsports.  During planning and development, it was most inspired by the AE86 generation of the Corolla, better known as the Hachi-Roku, meaning ‘8-6’ in Japanese.  The AE86 was a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive coupe that was lightweight and well balanced, making it a solid choice for driving enthusiasts.

Inspired by the AE86, the FR-S is designed around the core goal of achieving ‘Pure Balance’, which begins with the strategic use of the world’s only flat boxer engine in a front-engine, rear-wheel drive configuration.  The engine’s compact size and flat shape allow it to be mounted mid-ship and extremely low, giving the car a dynamically favorable front-to-rear weight ratio of 53/43 and a low center of gravity comparable to some exotic supercars.

The FR-S’s 2.0 liter, naturally aspirated four-cylinder engine is the result of a joint development between Toyota and Subaru.  The partnership begins by combining Subaru’s newly developed, horizontally opposed engine and Toyota’s cutting-edge D-45 injection system which incorporates both direct and port injection for each cylinder, one injecting directly into the combustion chamber, and the other a port injector located above the intake valves.  Adopted from the Lexus IS F, D-45 injection is a new technology for the Scion family.  The D-45 system uses the direct injectors at all engine speeds.  Both the direct and port injectors are used at certain engine speeds and under certain engine loads to help fill out mid-range torque.  The D-45 is also a key technology that reduces vehicle emissions.  FR-S heads utilize dual variable valve timing, making adjustments to the intake-and exhaust-cam timing to help optimize power, torque and fuel mileage.  The D-45 system, partnered with a high 12.5:1 compression ratio, results in an impressive 200 hp at 7,000 rpm and 151 lb.ft. of torque at 6,400 rpm.  Despite the engine’s powerful 100 hp per liter, the FR-S has EPA estimated ratings of 34 mpg/highway when paired with the automatic transmission, and EPA estimated 30 mpg with the manual transmission.

The flat-four mates with either a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic, which I tested, transmission.  The manual offers quick, precise shifts with a short-throw; while the automatic features aggressive up shifts and sporty rev-matched down shifts that are initiated by steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters.  The automatic features Dynamic Rev Management technology that quickly raises the engine speed to help match engine revs to gear ratios on downshifts, limiting driveline shock and adding to the visceral experience of driving the car.  The automatic also features a Sport Mode that quickens shift timing as well as throttle response.  In Sport Mode, the transmission will also hold gears longer at higher revs before upshifting, making it easier to exploit the torque and horsepower in the upper reaches of the rev range.  I haven’t had so much fun with a paddle shifting automatic transmission in a while-so quick, so precise, so powerful when you floor the throttle.  Both transmissions have the same 4.10:1 final drive ratio and helping to put the power down on the pavement with precision and immediacy is the standard Torsen Limited Slip Differential.

The FR-S’s low weight (2,806-auto/2,758 lbs.-manual) is complimented by a dynamically tuned suspension setup consisting of MacPherson struts up front with a 18mm stabilizer bar and a double-wishbone system in the rear with a 14mm stabilizer bar.  Excellent steering feedback and input is provided by electronic power rack & pinion steering with a sport 13:1 steering ratio.  Lightweight 17X7 in. alloy wheels are wrapped with 215/45R17 in. Michelin Primacy high-performance tires that provide excellent grip and traction when you call for it at launch and a smooth quiet ride at speed.  The car is so light and nimble that it is a challenge worth taking when tackling steep curving roads when you can get away from traffic.  This combination gives you the feeling of ‘riding on rails’.  Even more so when you choose to shut down the Traction Control and let the rear slide out when in the curves.

Quickly and safely slowing the FR-S down from speed are power-assisted four-wheel disc brakes.  Up front are 11.6 in. vented discs clamped with dual-piston calipers, and 11.4 in. vented discs in the rear clamped with single-piston calipers.  Standard ABS, EBD, BA and Smart Stop technology help you brake harder during server braking maneuvers and when braking on wet or slick pavement.

The bold exterior of the all-new FR-S is a solid reflection of its inner power.  The profile, inspired by the Toyota 2000GT, reveals a hood and roof-line that is remarkably sleek and low, giving it an aerodynamic shape that channels air cleanly over the top.  The low stance continues to exaggerate the coupe’s menacing face, which is made up of sharp lines, a wide lower intake and angular headlights that house the projector-beam halogen lamps.  The aggressive front fenders protrude upward and boast the iconic ‘86’ piston emblem, which highlights the car’s AE86 heritage as well as its unique new boxer engine.  The rear fascia sits low and wide, with aerodynamic lower treatments that surround the sporty dual exhaust system.  LEDs illuminate the edgy taillights, while center-mounted backup lights finish the muscular design.

The FR-S’s interior includes a 2+2 seating configuration that is designed with both form and function in mind.  The comfortable yet assertive front bucket seats feature deep bolsters to keep you snug during spirited driving and are mounted extremely low, while the rear seat folds down flat, creating flexible space.  It also comes standard with unique FR-S badged floor mats.  The large center-mounted tachometer is the focus of the three-gauge cluster and features a programmable shift-indicator, which has a small but intense indicator that lights up when redline is reached.  You can also set the warning to go off in 100-rpm increments, starting at 2,000 rpm.  A chime can be programmed to sound when redline is approached. Speed is monitored by both digital and analog gauges.  It really puts you in a race-inspired feeling every time you light up the boxer engine.  Further enhancing that feeling is the performance-oriented, 365-millimeter, leather-wrapped steering wheel that has both tilt and telescoping adjustments for the perfect reach and angle.  You’ll also notice the aluminum pedals with rubber inserts matching the door kick plates.  The soft-skin dash top has a ‘flat horizon’ design, influenced by the simple purity of the Toyota 2000GT dash.  At the center of the dash top is a raised rib, which functions as a ‘centerline’ that reflects at the base of the windshield, helping a skilled performance driver intuitively find the center of the car.

The all-new FR-S comes standard with an eight-speaker AM-FM-CD-USB 300-watt maximum output Pioneer audio system with standard features such as HD radio, Bluetooth and streaming audio.  The FR-S is the first Toyota to offer a connected multimedia audio system called BeSpoke, powered by Pioneer’s Zypr.  When connected to an iPhone, Scion’s BeSpoke system will offer a higher level of connectivity features and personalized content like Facebook, Twitter, Internet radio, among others.  Other standard features include remote keyless entry, remote trunk and fuel filler door, power door locks/power windows with express up/down, A/C, map lights, grab handles above each door, variable speed wipers/washers, cruise control, a deep glove box, dual cupholders and storage slots in each door.

FR-S comes standard with six airbags, including dual-stage advanced driver/front passenger airbags, tire pressure monitoring system, front-seat-mounted airbags and side curtain airbags.

Being in the driver’s seat of the all-new FR-S is like being in a real racecar.  It is so light and nimble, so a part of you when taking the car through its paces at higher than normal speeds.  You feel more confident that the car will do exactly as you wish it to do, with flying colors.

2013 Scion FR-S Beauty Right Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Beauty Side Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Beauty Rear Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Beauty Left Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Tire Wheel Brake Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Side Vent Style Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Cockpit Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Cluster Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Front Seats Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Bucket Seat Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Door Trim Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Traction Systems Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Badge Done Small
2013 Scion FR-S Engine Done Small

Copyright: 2012 Harvey Schwartz

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base FR-S (automatic transmission) $$25,300.00
  • Engine: 2.0-liter DOHC 16-valve Boxer/Flat (horizontally opposed) 4-cylinder 200 horsepower @ 7000 rpm / 151 ft-lbs. @ 6600 rpm
  • Track: f/r-59.8/60.6in.
  • Wheelbase: 101.2in.
  • Height: 50.6in.
  • Headroom: f/r-37/35in.
  • Legroom: f/r-41.9/29.9in.
  • Cargo volume: 6.9cu.ft.
  • Fuel tank: 13.2 gallons
  • 0-60 mph: 6.2 seconds
  • EPA mileage: 22 mpg/city, 34 mpg/highway


First Drive: 2013 Scion FR-S Review – Hype Approved 10
Aug
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, featured, Scion, Scion FR-S, Test Drives on 08 10th, 2012

For many years, enthusiasts have begged for an affordable rear-wheel-drive vehicle that appeases to need of a true drivers vehicle without much compromise. Toyota has stepped up to the plate to give us what we wanted with their all-new 2013 Scion FR-S.

Probably one of the most highly anticipated vehicles that enthusiasts could actually consider for their next ‘realistic’ low-cost purchase is the new Scion FR-S and its Subaru BRZ sibling. Both derived from a joint venture between Toyota and Subaru, the new Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ are the quintessential choice for many enthusiasts. Additionally, they satisfy a wide range of consumers seeking a sporty rear-wheel-drive coupe well under $30K.

The new 2013 FR-S, sold under the Scion badge here in America and as the Toyota GT86 in overseas markets, reintroduces the legacy of the original Toyota AE86 (Corolla Levin/Sprinter Trueno). The AE86 made its mark well known and continues to do so, even after its demise in 1987, in the heart of enthusiasts all over the world. The whole conception of the AE86 gave enthusiasts a relatively lightweight rear-wheel-drive sports coupe platform to build off of, and now the FR-S marks the return of that origin, the return of “Hachi-Roku” (eight-six).

The Scion brand has been known for a big enthusiast following but never has it offered a vehicle appreciated so well by true drivers. When I say “true drivers”, it means those who can appreciate a car that communicates to the driver as well as Michael Phelps does to the water in the Olympic swimming pool. It is a vehicle that could be commonly seen on a racetrack and then driven home at the end of the race. Moreover, the Scion FR-S makes its communication skills prevalent in virtually every aspect of is balance, sharp steering, low center of gravity (lowest center of gravity of all current production vehicles) and overall handling dynamics.

Having spent a full week with the new Scion FR-S, I can contest to it being every bit as good as a multitude of other journalists have claimed. The new Scion FR-S proves itself as a contender in the realm of cars that enthusiasts want to drive every day and experience on a track.

The new Scion FR-S is powered by a 4-cylinder 200 horsepower 151 ft. lbs. of torque 2.0-liter boxer (horizontally opposed) engine. The distinctive sound that comes under the lightweight aluminum hood takes a bit getting accustomed to when I start to think I am driving a Toyota product. The Subaru engineering definitely shines through its direct-injection flat-4-cylinder. Revving through the rpm band becomes particularly consistent with power output. No surprises here, other than a somewhat flat power spot between 3,000 rpm and 4,500 rpm. Anything after 5,000 rpm is a sweet spot where the flat-4 starts to really put thing in motion all the way to the 7,400 redline. There is even a red blinking shift-light at the top of the center-positioned tachometer to kindly let you know when you should engage the next gear. I later discovered that the shift-light can be adjusted to different rpm levels.

Numbers wise, the FR-S isn’t a straight-line thrill machine, however, that is not the FR-S’ disposition. The FR-S deserves to be pushed to its limits, on a track. Doing so in stock form will put the FR-S chassis at the mercy of the deplorable low rolling resistance Michelin Primacy HP tires, 215/45/17 in all 4 corners. The superb balance and driving aptitude of the FR-S is sharp and up to the challenge of the most demanding tracks; the stock tires, not so much. The tire dilemma is a relatively easy fix, considering some consumers will take the liberty of letting the FR-S’ near perfect weight distribution of 53/47 percent front/rear really shine with a set of stickier rubber.

My driving experience with the new 2013 Scion FR-S limits my perception to local roads, highways and a closed parking lot area. Although I was able to break the rear-end loose a few times in the closed parking area, I could not really contest to the true tracking ability of the FR-S. I can certainly say it is a proven road-going machine pulling a 0.93g on the skidpad and giving just enough feedback through the nicely weighted electric steering rack.  The standard torsen limited slip differential allows a progressive counter balance of the rear when traction control is turned off. Rowing through the direct-feeling 6-speed shifter is a joy as well. The clutch pedal has minimal travel and has a perfectly weighted pressure plate feel. The steering is surprisingly sharp and quick, too.

A standard stability and traction control system has a full-on default mode, ‘VSC sport’ mode, and a completely ‘off’ setting. Using the VSC (Vehicle Skid Control) sport mode lets the FR-S slip out a bit more than the full-on mode, slightly delaying stability and traction control intervention. Don’t expect sport mode to allow many ‘tricks’, as it seems to only be a slight delay before the subtle safety net starts to brake the wheels in an effort to keep the FR-S ‘in line’. Holding down the traction control off button for a few seconds is the only way to truly experience the FR-S’ track competency.

There is no doubt that the FR-S is on the smallish side, but that is not a complete deal breaker for me considering the fun-factor of this 2,700 pound sports coupe. Up front, two passengers have plenty of room. The steering wheel is height-adjustable and telescopes, while the driver’s seat has height adjustability. This gives my 6 foot 3 inch frame plenty of room with just enough space for a helmet.

Living every-day with the new 2013 Scion FR-S was my only minor grievance, considering I had to take my 4-year-old daughter to school a couple days in the FR-S. This gave me a chance to see how well the FR-S fits into my every-day family life. Getting a car-seat into the back of the FR-S proved to be a task, but it actually fit leaving whoever was to sit in the front seat with very little leg room.  Don’t expect to pile two of your teen to adult sized friends in the back if you are anywhere near as tall as me. Adjusting the front seat all the way back will have the seatbacks touching the deep rear bucket-like seats.

The new 2013 Scion FR-S interior is probably the sportiest you will see for its $25K price range. The front micro-fiber-type cloth seats are generously bolstered and optimally positioned for getting down and dirty with some serious driving. The driver’s seat in proportion to the perfectly spaced pedals begs you to try some heel tow action while performing seamless rev-matched downshifts. It is as if the FR-S design teams were track-seekers themselves, hmm.

Toyota and Subaru engineers thought out the new FR-S (and Subaru BRZ) very well, inside and out. The exterior design even has a part in communicating to the driver, too. With an aggressively styled front fascia and low proportioned body, the FR-S slices through the air with a low 0.27 drag coefficient. Where the hood meets the side fenders, it is raised to convey to the driver where the front wheels are placed. This is especially helpful in knowing exactly where your front wheels are placed on say, a track- hint hint!

Believe it or not, efficiency is at the heart of the FR-S thanks to its sappy yet efficient tires, excellent aerodynamics and a direct-injection 200 hp flat-4 engine. However, the new Scion FR-S could use another 60 horsepower to even be considered for stoplight drag races. Aside from the FR-S’s 6.2 seconds 0-60 mph time, you can expect to get a good 30 mpg on the highway and 22 mpg in the city. During my time with the FR-S, I was able to average about 27 mpg around town and score an amazing 32 mpg on the highway steadily cruising at 70 mph.

My 2013 Scion FR-S has a base price of $24,995 including $785 delivery and handling fee. The new 2013 Scion FR-S can be had with an optional 6-speed automatic transmission with steering wheel mounted paddle shifters, starting at $25,300. A Bespoke touch-screen audio/infotainment system including 5.8-inch LCD touch-screen (no navigation) is available as an $845 option featuring PANDORA radio, HD Radio (AM/FM), iPhone app and USB connectivity.

With just over 2,700 pounds to push around, the rear-wheel-drive FR-S isn’t a complete pushover. For a base price starting at $24,955, the new FR-S is probably the ultimate tuner foundation and a proper return of the affordable rear-wheel-drive sports car. Everywhere I went people would stare at the FR-S. Some were in awe of actually seeing a vehicle that has been anticipated for many years now, others were simply curious as they did not know what the FR-S was. In any given situation, I was confident behind the wheel of what seems to be the hottest $25K rear-wheel-drive sports coupe around.

2013-scion-fr-s-2
2013-scion-fr-s-drive
2013-scion-fr-s
2013-scion-fr-s-side-1
2013-scion-fr-s-side
2013-scion-fr-s-front
2013-scion-fr-s-rear
2013-scion-fr-s-86-badge
2013-scion-fr-s-wheel-tire
2013-scion-fr-s-dashboard-interior
2013-scion-fr-s-gauge-cluster
2013-scion-fr-s-front-seats
2013-scion-fr-s-manual-6-speed-shifter
2013-scion-fr-s-door-trim
2013-scion-fr-s-engine-manifold
2013-scion-fr-s-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base FR-S (manual transmission) $24,955.00
  • Engine: 2.0-liter DOHC 16-valve Boxer/Flat (horizontally opposed) 4-cylinder 200 horsepower @ 7000 rpm / 151 ft-lbs. @ 6600 rpm
  • Track: f/r-59.8/60.6in.
  • Wheelbase: 101.2in.
  • Height: 50.6in.
  • Headroom: f/r-37/35in.
  • Legroom: f/r-41.9/29.9in.
  • Cargo volume: 6.9cu.ft.
  • Fuel tank: 13.2 gallons
  • 0-60 mph: 6.2 seconds
  • EPA mileage: 22 mpg/city, 30 mpg/highway

 



Subaru BRZ, Scion FR-S Top List Of Fastest Selling Cars 21
Jun
Posted by Kurt Ernst in 2013 Scion FR-S, 2013 Subaru BRZ, Acura, audi, Automotive, Kurt, New Car Sales, News, Scion, Subaru on 06 21st, 2012

The 2013 Subaru BRZ. Image: Subaru

We enthusiasts have been telling the auto industry the same thing for years, if not decades: build an affordable rear-drive sport coupe with plenty of upgrade potential, and the buyers will come. It looks like we were right, since Edmunds is reporting that the Subaru BRZ and the Scion FR-S currently have the lowest days-to-turn (DTT) in the industry.

Days-to-turn is exactly what it sounds like: the number of days between delivery of a car from a manufacturer to delivery of the same vehicle to a customer. The industry average for vehicles in the United States is 53 DTT, while Subaru’s BRZ took just four DTT and Scion’s FR-S took only five DTT. Next on the fastest-seller list was another limited-production car, the Audi TT-RS; it stayed on dealer lots a mere seven days.

You could easily make the argument that these three examples should be excluded from the list, since all are specialty cars with short supply and high demand. That would make the real best seller car number four on the list: Acura’s new ILX sedan, which took only eight DTT. Last in the top five was Toyota’s new Prius c, which found a new home in an average of 10 days.

We’re not sure there’s a common theme here. Sure, all five models are compact in size, but three emphasize entertainment value above all else, while two are more focused on fuel economy. If there’s any takeaway for the auto industry in these numbers, it’s probably this: when you build cars that customers want to buy, they don’t stay on dealer lots very long.



Video: Stock Scion FR-S Lays Down 173 Rear-Wheel-Horsepower 20
Jun
Posted by Darryl in 2013 Scion FR-S, 2013 Subaru BRZ, Automotive, Dyno, Scion FR-S, Subaru BRZ on 06 20th, 2012

The new Scion FR-S, alongside of the new Subaru BRZ, is one of the most highly anticipated low-cost enthusiast oriented vehicles to hit the market. With its heritage and engineering aspects coming from both ends of the Japanese car culture spectrum (Subaru and Toyota), it is sure to be a hit among enthusiasts looking for one of the best platforms to build off of and modify. To prove that the Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ is one of the best foundations to start with in the tuner world, we have posted Inside Line’s Dyno run of the FR-S below.

Surprisingly the new Scion FR-S is quite the efficient little rear-wheel-drive vehicle putting out a healthy 173 horsepower to the wheels. With a rating of 200 horsepower to the flywheel, the FR-S has a relatively small power loss through the drivetrain. In knowing this, tuners are already ahead of the game. We await wheel-horsepower numbers of the first few tuners who bolt-on that monster turbo kit to the new FR-S or BRZ. Exciting stuff!



Dealerships Charging Hefty $7K Market Value Markup on new Scion FR-S 25
May
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, News, Scion, Scion FR-S, TOYOTA on 05 25th, 2012

The new 2013 Scion FR-S is sure to be a big hit among enthusiasts looking for an affordable rear-wheel-drive sports coupe. Unfortunately, those looking to pay around the $25K MSRP price may be out of luck due to Toyota/Scion dealerships tagging a hefty Market Value Markup of almost $7,000.

Market value markups are nothing new under the sun. Better yet, it is rather expected to see such markups on new vehicles that are in high demand. It is actually a legal practice but as you can imagine, paying 7 grand over sticker price on a new Scion FR-S may not sit well with enthusiasts especially when you can take $35K somewhere else and get something like a more-powerful Mustang GT or even a Subaru WRX STI.

What do you think about dealership markups on new high-demand vehicles? Is it justified, or are Toyota/Scion dealerships smoking some really good stuff when it comes to marking-up the new Scion FR-S’ price?

We were able to obtain an image of the sticker price of a new Scion FR-S at a local south Florida dealership via VWVortex forum.



Report: Scion Says No To Factory Turbo FR-S 25
Apr
Posted by Kurt Ernst in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, Kurt, Scion on 04 25th, 2012

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

If you’ve been holding out on buying a new Scion FR-S until a faster model is released, we’ve got some bad news for you: according to Car and Driver, such a model makes no financial sense for Scion to produce. Without forced induction, Scion can make a profit selling the FR-S in the mid-$20k range. Add a turbo, and the selling price would start pushing the $30k barrier, a price that Scion deems too expensive for its customers.

Subaru, on the other hand, has positioned its BRZ a bit more upscale, which could allow for the expense of turbocharging down the line. Such a move is still undecided, and earlier rumors reported that Subaru was developing a normally aspirated STI version of its BRZ. Cost aside, there simple isn’t a lot of room to fit a turbo, intercooler and associated plumbing under the hood.

That doesn’t mean that FR-S or BRZ buyers are out of options, since we expect the aftermarket to deliver everything from intakes through turbo and supercharger kits and exhausts in the coming months. Scion may not be willing to build a turbo FR-S, but we’re guessing that plenty of aftermarket vendors will step up to the plate.



2013 Scion FR-S Pricing Announced 22
Mar
Posted by Kurt Ernst in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, Kurt, News, Scion on 03 22nd, 2012

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Scion

Scion’s rear-drive FR-S coupe is arguably the most anticipated product in the brand’s history. Blending light weight, nimble handling and reasonable horsepower, the FR-S was built to offer enthusiasts on a budget a solid platform to build from. In other words, it had to offer an affordable starting price, which isn’t easy to do when the Japanese yen is strong and the U.S. dollar is weak.

Somehow, Toyota found a way to keep pricing in check, and the FR-S will start at $24,200 with a six-speed manual gearbox, hitting $25,300 with the paddle-shifter equipped, rev-matching six speed automatic. That doesn’t include the destination charge ($730, although Southeast Toyota and Gulf States Toyota destination charges may differ), so call it “just under $25k” for the manual gearbox FR-S. Option and package prices haven’t been released, but we suspect you could add another $5,000 to the price of the car if you went heavy on the accessories.

The EPA has released fuel economy data for the Scion FR-S, too. Equipped with the six-speed manual, the Scion coupe will return an estimated 22 mpg city, 30 mpg highway and 25 mpg combined. Opt for the six-speed automatic transmission, and fuel economy jumps to 25 mpg city, 34 mpg highway and 28 mpg combined.



‘First 86′ Lets You Take Early Delivery Of A Scion FR-S. Maybe. 11
Jan
Posted by Kurt Ernst in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, Kurt, News, Scion on 01 11th, 2012

If your local Scion dealer is about to hit you with a restraining order for bugging him about Scion FR-S availability, here’s some good news: Scion wants to give 86 fans the ability to take early delivery of its FR-S sport coupe. While all the fine print has yet to be inked, here’s what we know about how the “First 86” program will work.

On January 12, at 12:00 noon EST, Scion will open up a dedicated purchase request website (www.ScionFirst86.com). Customers interested in buying one of the first 86 Scion FR-S models in the United States will then choose their car’s color and transmission choice (no other options are available), and submit the purchase request form to Scion. The site will remain up for eight hours and 6 minutes (86, get it?), before the ability to enter the lottery will close.

Within 24 hours, Scion will notify the 86 winners, who’ll be sent a date-stamped e-mail with an order confirmation. Winners have 96 hours to visit their chosen Scion dealer with the order confirmation and a deposit check for $500. Once the order is written, Scion will provide winners with regular updates on the delivery of their cars, which will arrive before the general public is able to take delivery of an FR-S.

The program seems simple enough, but there are plenty of unanswered questions. Pricing for the FR-S has not yet been set, and then there’s the issue of “Additional Dealer Markup.” The Scion FR-S will be a hot car at launch, and greedy dealers will want to pad profits on the rear-drive coupe. Sure, you may win the ability to buy the first FR-S, but can you afford to pay a dealer $10k over sticker to take delivery?

We’re not saying that’s going to happen, only that it’s likely. After all, some BMW dealers were asking $50k over sticker (really) for one of the few 1-Series M cars brought into the United States, and $5k over sticker is about normal for cars like the Mustang Boss 302 Laguna Seca. Everyone wants to be the first kid on the block with the latest toy, and that generally comes at a cost.

Scion isn’t giving a lot more information than we’ve posted above, but you’ll find its Q&A on the “First 86” program here.



It’s Official: The U.S. Is Getting The Scion FR-S 1
Dec
Posted by Kurt Ernst in 2013 Scion FR-S, Automotive, Kurt, new cars, News, Scion, Scion FR-S, Subaru BRZ, Tokyo Motor Show, Toyota FT-86, Toyota GT 86 on 12 1st, 2011

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

By now you’ve seen enough pictures and video of the 2013 Toyota FT 86 / GT 86 and Subaru BRZ to know that there aren’t a lot of differences in styling or specifications between the various brands. Get set to add one more (nearly) identical car to the list, in the form of the Scion FR-S. As we suspected, Scion will use the FR-S to grow sales (and brand awareness) in the United States, which means that you won’t be buying a Toyota FT-86 on these shores.

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

After many years of making due with current Toyota products, the folks here stateside will have some real excitement in the Toyota line to rejoice about only it will be wearing the Scion badge. The Scion line will now have a total of five vehicles to offer, the xB, xD, iQ, tC, and FR-S. For obvious reasons, the FR-S would be the so-called ‘flagship’ of the bunch.

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

As with the Toyota and Subaru versions, expect the Scion to be a blank canvas for enthusiasts. By the time the coupe hits the market, you can expect a variety of performance upgrades to be available from Toyota’s TRD and aftermarket suppliers alike. As with Mazda’s MX-5 Miata, those who buy the FR-S to use for track days or autocross won’t be keeping it stock for very long.

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

The Scion comes with the same 200 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. of torque offered by the Subaru, and we suspect the curb weight will also be in the area of 2,700 pounds. The same six-speed manual and paddle-shifted six-speed automatic transmissions will be offered, appealing to both the hardcore enthusiast and the real-world driver who faces a daily commute in rush hour traffic.

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

The 2013 Scion FR-S. Image: Toyota

Pricing hasn’t been set, but in keeping with Scion’s bang-for-the-buck philosophy we’d expect the FR-S to start in the low $20k range. Expect it to hit Scion dealers in the spring of 2012. For now, you can configure your own Scion FR-S at FRS-Scion.com!

scionfrs001
scionfrs002
scionfrs003
scionfrs004
scionfrs005
scionfrs006
scionfrs007
scionfrs008
scionfrs009
scionfrs010
scionfrs011
scionfrs012
scionfrs013
scionfrs014
scionfrs015
scionfrs016
scionfrs017

Hit up the press release directly from Toyota for more information and additional specifications on the new 2013 Scion FR-S.

2013 Scion FR-S Brings the SPORT Back to the CAR

– Low center of gravity and lightweight design achieves a “Pure Balance”
– Compact rear-wheel drive sports car makes world debut
– World’s first boxer engine to utilize Toyota’s D4-S direct and port injection system

Los Angeles – November 30, 2011 – Scion tonight unveiled its 2013 FR-S compact rear-wheel drive sports car to a crowd of eager car enthusiasts. The high-performance coupe is the fifth model to join the Scion family and will go on sale in the spring of 2012.

The FR-S, which stands for Front-engine, Rear-wheel drive, Sport; is Scion’s definition of an authentic rear-wheel-drive sports car with exceptionally balanced performance and handling, compelling style, flexible utility and surprising MPG.

“Serving as a laboratory for Toyota, Scion is always experimenting with new things,” said Jack Hollis, Scion vice president. “The brand is iconic with the xB, adrenalized by the tC, and groundbreaking with the iQ. The FR-S will no doubt serve as the halo car, expanding Scion into a new dimension of driving performance.”

The FR-S is a true “scion,” born into a lengthy history of Toyota performance cars and motorsports. The sports car is most inspired by the AE86 generation of the Corolla, better known as the Hachi-Roku, meaning “8-6″ in Japanese. The front-engine, rear-wheel-drive coupe was lightweight and well balanced, making it a solid choice for driving enthusiasts.

Inspired by the AE86, the FR-S is designed around the core goal of achieving, “Pure Balance.” The balance begins with the strategic use of the world’s only flat boxer engine in a front-engine, rear-wheel drive configuration. The engine’s compact size and flat shape allow it to be mounted mid-ship and extremely low, giving the car a dynamically favorable front-to-rear weight ratio of 53:47 and a low center of gravity comparable to some exotic supercars.

The FR-S’s 2.0-liter, naturally aspirated four-cylinder engine is the result of a joint development between Toyota and Subaru. The partnership begins by combining Subaru’s newly developed horizontally opposed engine and Toyota’s cutting edge D-4S injection system that incorporates both direct and port injection. The D-4S system, partnered with a high 12.5:1 compression ratio, results in an impressive 200 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque.

“We all know that it’s not hard to make horsepower and torque, but it is hard to do all that and still achieve impressive fuel economy,” Hollis said. “The FR-S accomplishes all three.”

The flat-four mates with either a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic transmission. The manual offers quick, precise shifts with a short-throw; while the automatic transmission features aggressive up shifts and sporty rev-matched down shifts that are initiated by steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. Power is transferred to the pavement via a limited-slip differential.

The idea of “Pure Balance” is further realized by the FR-S’s lightweight design and compact size. The combination allows the car to be quick and nimble into and out of corners, with dynamic maneuverability and confident handling. The coupe’s weight is kept to a minimum by utilizing an aluminum hood, a solid roof, and by featuring a trunk design instead of a hatchback.

The FR-S’s low weight is matched with a dynamically tuned suspension setup consisting of MacPherson struts up front and a double wishbone system in the rear. Lightweight 17-inch alloy wheels and ventilated disc brakes are on all four corners.

The fierce exterior of the FR-S is a solid reflection of its inner power. The profile, inspired by the Toyota 2000GT, reveals a hood and roof-line that is remarkably sleek and low, giving it an aerodynamic shape that channels air cleanly over to the top. The low stance continues to exaggerate the coupe’s menacing face, which is made up of sharp lines, a wide mouth and angular headlights. The aggressive front fenders protrude upward and boast the iconic ’86′ piston emblem, which highlights the car’s AE86 heritage as well as its unique new boxer engine. The rear fascia sits low and wide, with aerodynamic lower treatments that surround the sporty dual exhaust system. LEDs illuminate the edgy taillights, while center-mounted backup lights finish the muscular design.

The FR-S’s interior features a 2+2 seating configuration that is designed with both form and function in mind. The front seats are mounted extremely low and are comfortable yet assertive, while the rear seat folds down flat, creating flexible space. The large center-mounted tachometer is the focus of the three-gauge cluster, keeping the driver informed of the engine’s vitals. Speed is monitored by both digital and analog gauges.

Scion FR-S Preliminary Specifications
Length: 166.7 in.
Width: 69.9 in.
Height: 51.2 in. (not including antenna base)
Wheelbase: 101.2 in.
Track
– Front: 59.8 in.
– Rear: 60.6 in.
Seating capacity: 4
Engine
Total displacement: 1,998 cc
Type: Horizontally opposed four-cylinder, D-4S injection, DOHC
Bore × stroke: 86 × 86 mm.
Maximum output: 200hp @ 7,000 rpm
Maximum torque: 151 lb.-ft. @ 6,600 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed manual or 6-speed automatic with paddle shifters
Driveline: Rear-wheel drive
Suspension
– Front: MacPherson struts
– Rear: Double wishbone
Brakes
– Front: Ventilated Disc
– Rear: Ventilated Disc
Tires
– Front: 215/45R17
– Rear: 215/45R17
Fuel tank: 13.2 gallons
Fuel: Premium Unleaded







 Category



 Blogroll