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Need for Speed Movie: Trailer 28
Nov
Posted by CarBlog Staff in Movies, Off Topic, Popular, racing, supercars, Videos on 11 28th, 2013

need-for-speed

The Need for Speed film is album is almost  upon us and just to tantalize our tastebuds even further, they have just released a full length trailer.

And yes, we have it here for you to see!

The film circles around muscle car mechanic and street racer, Tobey, who is unfortunately framed for a crime that he did not commit. When he eventually gets out of jail, he is even more determined than ever to settle the score with the guy that was responsible for his conviction.

Expect a lot of fast cars, daring racing and some intense smashes. But that is how like it though, isn’t it?

Need for Speed opens in theaters on March 14 2014.

Check out the trailer below:



Rush: Official Trailer 9
Oct
Posted by CarBlog Staff in Formula-One, Movies, Off Topic, Popular, Videos on 10 9th, 2013

RUSH

If you are a car lover, especially a Formula One lover, you have to go and see this film.

Rush is a film about the infamous 1976 Formula One season. It chronicles the rivalry between legendary Formula One drivers, James Hunt and Niki Lauda.

This biographical film is different than most in it’s genre. It’s deep and beautifully written while still being action packed (obviously, a it’s a racing film). It has been praised by critics and is already receiving some heavy Oscar buzz.

Rush stars Chris Hemsworth (Thor) as James Hunt and Daniel Bruhl as Niki Lauda.

Written by Peter Morgan and directed by Ron Howard – Rush is a definite must for everyone, even the ladies!

It was released in September, so check your local cinema for listings. Believe me, you don’t want to miss this one!

Check out the trailer below:



Compilation of Car Scenes in Famous Films 22
Aug
Posted by Kelly Levinsohn in cars, Movies, Off Topic, Popular, Videos on 08 22nd, 2013

Cars

Have you ever watched a film that did not feature a car somewhere, somehow? Mmm. It’s quite difficult to think of any!

Unless it is a period film, a fantasy film or something pre-historic, most modern day films feature a car or automobile somewhere in some scene.

Supercut, the YouTube channel that mashes everything together, has released a two minute compilation clip of scenes from movies that feature the super popular ‘widescreen shot’ through the windshield of a car.

This shot, as you will see, is a wide angled shot of people driving in a car, and you, the viewer see them through the windshield. I’m sure you can think of some scenes like that already!

The clip features scenes from more than 30 famous films – all using the same ‘widescreen-through-the-windshield’ shot.

Think you can name all the films these scenes are from? Go on over to Supercut’s YouTube page to see a full list of all the films used to create this mashup, and check your answers.

Just another way of showing the importance of cars in pop culture, films and, of course, everyday lives.

Enjoy!

Source: Autoblog



‘A Good Day To Die Hard:’ Action Movie Or Infomercial? Video 30
Jan
Posted by Kurt Ernst in A Good Day To Die Hard, Automotive, Editorial, Kurt, Mercedes Benz, Movie, Movies, video on 01 30th, 2013
The Mercedes-Benz Sprinter, with co-star Bruce Willis - image: Mercedes-Benz
The Mercedes-Benz Sprinter, with co-star Bruce Willis - image: Mercedes-Benz

The Mercedes-Benz Sprinter, with co-star Bruce Willis – image: Mercedes-Benz

In case you were wondering what Bruce Willis is up to these days, the answer is this: he’s been reprising the role of super-cop John McClane in a new Die Hard movie, entitled A Good Day To Die Hard. The plot has him in Moscow in search of his wayward son, but instead he runs into terrorists trying to steal a nuclear weapon. He does track down his son, who turns out to be a CIA operative. Action-packed family fun ensues.

Of course that’s just one version of the plot. In the second, perhaps more relevant version, Willis shares screen time with no less than 14 different Mercedes-Benz models, including the C-Class and E-Class sedans, the G-Class and GL-Class SUVs, the Sprinter van, a Maybach 57, the legendary Unimog and even a Zetros heavy-duty truck.

Sure, there are rival brands in the film, too, like the line of BMW 7-Series sedans (presumably used by the bad guys) in the opening of the trailer. None are featured quite as prominently as the three-pointed star’s wares, which display logos throughout the film. We’re willing to cut Mercedes a bit of latitude here, since its vehicles are popular thoughout Europe and Russia. So are heavy-duty trucks from brands like Tatra, and their absence is more than a bit conspicuous.

That won’t stop us from watching the movie, since it’s not likely to be up for an academy award in 2014 anyway. Still, we can’t help but wonder when the shift from including product placements in movies, to filming movies around product placements, occurred.



GM: We’re Not Funding A Remake Of ‘Cannonball Run’ 20
Oct
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Cannonball Run, Kurt, Movie, Movies, News, Pop Culture on 10 20th, 2011

If you’ve never seen The Cannonball Run, beg, borrow or steal a copy as soon as you have a chance. It’s not that the 1981 film was a remarkable achievement in cinematography, and it’s certainly not an accurate portrayal of the actual 1979 Cannonball-Baker-Sea-To-Shining-Sea-Memorial-Trophy-Dash on which it’s based. It is, however, a snapshot of American pop culture in the early 1980s, back in a time when the national speed limit was 55 miles per hour and films generally got good bank based on the amount of cleavage shown.

It’s good fun, but it certainly doesn’t need a remake. The Cannonball-Baker is gone, replaced by Brock Yates’ One Lap of America. The 55 mile per hour speed limit is gone, replaced by more rational speed limits now set by individual states. Revisiting the Cannonball Run of the 1970s would be no more relevant today than revisiting the Watergate hearings; call us jaded, but life just isn’t that simple anymore.

Earlier this week, rumors started flying of a Cannonball Run remake. New York Magazine even went so far as to name Guy Ritchie as the director, with a cast to include Brad Pitt and Ben Stiller. General Motors would contribute a significant amount of funding to the project, which would ultimately serve as a giant product placement ad for GM vehicles. Call me a cynic, but it sounded like a big, steaming bowl of fail to me.

Now comes word from Autoblog that GM isn’t funding any such project, and GM’s Tom Henderson goes so far as to say he hasn’t seen a script. We’re not sure if that means there is no Cannonball remake, but GM is clear that it won’t be a two hour long ad for its vehicles.

Watch the original movie and appreciate it for what it is. Like the mid-seventies Cosworth Vega, a remake simply isn’t needed.



‘Senna’ Biopic Website Lists Dates And Cities 5
Aug
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Ayrton Senna, Events, F1, Kurt, Motorsport, Movies, Senna on 08 5th, 2011

Image courtesy of Producers Distribution Agency

Ayrton Senna da Silva died on May 1, 1994, when his Williams Renault left the track and hit a concrete barrier at the Tamburello corner during the San Marino Grand Prix. Officially, the accident happened when Senna’s car, on cold tires and a full fuel load, bottomed out and momentarily lost traction. Although the car left the track at almost 190 miles per hour, Senna had slowed the car down to 135 just before the moment of impact, and his Williams hit at what appeared to be a glancing blow.

If you’ve seen the crash, it strikes you as unremarkable; many drivers have walked away from far worse impacts. For Senna, it was not to be; the Brazilian driver, who many consider to be the greatest F1 driver of all time, was killed by blunt force trauma from the impact of the right front wheel against his helmet, coupled with two penetrating head wounds from suspension uprights. If Senna was a legend during his career, he’d become the closest thing to racing’s patron saint after his death.

Trying to capture the essence of a personality like Senna’s is near impossible. Those close to him considered Senna to be almost a force of nature, not just another headstrong athlete. He was a driver that physically could not accept losing, and his battles with other stars of the era (especially Alain Prost) are the stuff of legend.

“He never wanted to beat me,“ Prost said of Senna, “he wanted to humiliate me. He wanted to show the people he was much better.”

Of their on-track rivalry, Senna had a different perspective, saying, “All drivers go for their limits. My limits are different from Prost’s.”

If you ever saw Senna race, chances are you’ll do everything in your power to see his biopic, “Senna,” now in limited release nationwide. If you never saw the complete mastery that Senna displayed on a wet racetrack, or his utter indifference towards anything but crossing the finish line first, the movie is a look into an era of Grand Prix racing that’s come and gone. Today’s drivers have talent, but Senna was the last of the Formula One giants, who put everything on the line each and every time they strapped into a race car.

For dates, showtimes and cities, check out the official “Senna” website.



‘Senna’ Biopic Website Lists Dates And Cities 5
Aug
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Ayrton Senna, Events, F1, Kurt, Motorsport, Movies, Senna on 08 5th, 2011

Image courtesy of Producers Distribution Agency

Ayrton Senna da Silva died on May 1, 1994, when his Williams Renault left the track and hit a concrete barrier at the Tamburello corner during the San Marino Grand Prix. Officially, the accident happened when Senna’s car, on cold tires and a full fuel load, bottomed out and momentarily lost traction. Although the car left the track at almost 190 miles per hour, Senna had slowed the car down to 135 just before the moment of impact, and his Williams hit at what appeared to be a glancing blow.

If you’ve seen the crash, it strikes you as unremarkable; many drivers have walked away from far worse impacts. For Senna, it was not to be; the Brazilian driver, who many consider to be the greatest F1 driver of all time, was killed by blunt force trauma from the impact of the right front wheel against his helmet, coupled with two penetrating head wounds from suspension uprights. If Senna was a legend during his career, he’d become the closest thing to racing’s patron saint after his death.

Trying to capture the essence of a personality like Senna’s is near impossible. Those close to him considered Senna to be almost a force of nature, not just another headstrong athlete. He was a driver that physically could not accept losing, and his battles with other stars of the era (especially Alain Prost) are the stuff of legend.

“He never wanted to beat me,“ Prost said of Senna, “he wanted to humiliate me. He wanted to show the people he was much better.”

Of their on-track rivalry, Senna had a different perspective, saying, “All drivers go for their limits. My limits are different from Prost’s.”

If you ever saw Senna race, chances are you’ll do everything in your power to see his biopic, “Senna,” now in limited release nationwide. If you never saw the complete mastery that Senna displayed on a wet racetrack, or his utter indifference towards anything but crossing the finish line first, the movie is a look into an era of Grand Prix racing that’s come and gone. Today’s drivers have talent, but Senna was the last of the Formula One giants, who put everything on the line each and every time they strapped into a race car.

For dates, showtimes and cities, check out the official “Senna” website.







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