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Porsche Announces The AWD 911 Carrera 4 GTS 12
May
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, featured, Kurt, News, porsche, Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS, Porsche 911 Carrera GTS on 05 12th, 2011

Porsche's 911 Carrera 4 GTS Coupe and Cabriolet. Image: Porsche AG

When Porsche sent me the announcement of the new 911 Carrera 4 GTS, I saw it as both good news and bad news. The good news is that buyers now have an AWD option for what may be the most well-rounded 911 variant in modern history; the bad news is that I can’t afford to walk into my local dealership and say, “I’ll take one in black, please.” To say that I was impressed by the rear wheel drive 911 Carrera GTS is perhaps the understatement of the year. I was amazed by both it’s capabilities and it’s comfort, and if I could have designed a 911 from the ground up it would spec out a lot like the GTS. Think of it this way: a base 911 Carrera starts the 911 range, and the 911 GT3 RS tops the normally aspirated, road-going range until you get into the really exotic stuff (like the GT2 RS). The 911 Carrera GTS sits smack-dab in the middle of those two extremes, offering significantly more performance and handling than a base Carrera, but giving you much more creature comfort than the track-oriented GT3 RS. If you had to pick a sports car for both daily use and the occasional track day, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better alternative than the 911 Carrera GTS.

The 911 Carrera 4 GTS Cabrio. Image: Porsche AG

As good as the rear-drive Carrera GTS is, there are still customers who prefer the added traction of AWD, hence the reason for Porsche’s newest model. The Carrera 4 GTS gets the same 402 horsepower, 3.8 liter flat-six used in the rear drive version, and it uses the same wide track body style. Since you’re powering two more wheels (and have added weight, the run from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour takes a little longer in the AWD version. That said, a time of 4.6 seconds (or 4.4 seconds with the PDK gearbox) is still rather impressive. Even the still-heavier Cabriolet manages a 0 to 100 kph time of 4.8 seconds (4.6 with the PDK). The rear-drive GTS, when equipped with the PDK and the Sport-Chrono package, can manage a 0 to 100 kph run in 4.2 seconds, but I suspect that giving up 0.2 seconds won’t seem like a sacrifice for enthusiasts living where bad weather is a seasonal reality.

The 911 Carrera 4 GTS Coupe. Image: Porsche AG

The 911 Carrera 4 GTS goes on sale in Germany this July. Pricing and availability for this side of the pond haven’t yet been announced, but I’m sure we’ll see it by the end of the year.

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Press Release

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS – Now with All-Wheel-Drive
New Flagship Carrera ideal for all-weather performance

ATLANTA – May 12, 2011 – Building on the well-received 911 Carrera GTS with its extra power, visual panache and extensive extras for an attractive price, Porsche today announced the 911 Carrera 4 GTS. As an all-wheel-drive model, and when equipped with the proper tires, the Carrera 4 has proven more than competent for all seasons and all road conditions. The Carrera 4 GTS wraps an aggressive wide body around a long list of performance, comfort and cosmetic enhancements.

A GTS exclusive power upgrade of 23 hp over the 911 Carrera 4S on which it is based enables the 3.8-liter 911 Carrera 4 GTS – available as a coupe and cabriolet – to accelerate from zero to 60 mph 0.1 second faster; a Carrera 4 GTS coupe equipped with the optional seven-speed Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) and the optional Sport Chrono Package Plus makes the sprint in just 4.0 seconds. Top-track speed is also increased to 187 mph (186 mph w/PDK).

The 911 Carrera 4 GTS features an electronically-controlled Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel-drive system that delivers impressive traction and powerful acceleration in any driving situation. The electromagnetically-controlled multi-plate clutch reacts within fractions of a second and ensures optimum distribution of power between the front and rear axles. A standard mechanical limited-slip differential further improves traction and driving stability around turns and on varying road surfaces.

The 3.8-liter flat-six delivers its 408 hp thanks to a number of internal changes, including a special resonance intake manifold with six vacuum-controlled tuning flaps. Maximum torque is available at 4,200 rpm; 200 rpm earlier compared with the Carrera 4S. The extra power is enhanced by a standard sports exhaust system with four black tailpipes finished with polished, nano-coated inner shells.

Like every all-wheel-drive 911 model, the Carrera 4 GTS features a body with 44-mm wider wheel arches at the rear. It is also distinguishable by its SportDesign front apron, black side skirts from the 911 GT2 and a black panel between the rear tailpipes. Center-locking 19-inch RS Spyder design wheels, painted in high-gloss black with polished lips are a final visual flourish.

Inside, black is the dominant color, with the standard interior featuring Alcantara® on the center sections of the standard sport seats with their larger side bolsters. Black Alcantara® is also used wherever the driver comes into direct contact with the vehicle – like on the rim of the three-spoke SportDesign steering wheel and on the gear and handbrake levers.

The extra all-weather performance, visual muscle and standard equipment of the 911 Carrera 4 GTS comes at an attractive price. On sale this fall, the 911 Carrera 4 GTS Coupe will be available in the US at a base MSRP price of $110,200 while the 911 Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet will be priced at $120,100.

About Porsche Cars North America

Porsche Cars North America, Inc. (PCNA), based in Atlanta, Ga. is the exclusive U.S. importer of Porsche sports cars, the Cayenne SUV and Panamera Gran Turismo. Established in 1984, it is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Porsche AG, which is headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany, and employs approximately 220 people who provide parts, service, marketing and training for 196 dealers. They, in turn, work to provide Porsche customers with a best-in-class experience that is in keeping with the brand’s 63-year history and leadership in the advancement of vehicle performance, safety and efficiency. At the core of this success is Porsche’s proud racing heritage that boasts some 30,000 motorsport wins to date.

Source: Porsche



2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS: Goldilocks, Your Ride Is Here 14
Mar
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Favorite Cars, News, porsche, Porsche 911 Carrera GTS, Sports Cars on 03 14th, 2011

Image: Porsche

It’s been a long time since anyone read fairy tales to me, but here’s what I remember about Goldilocks: she did a B&E on the bear’s place and found most of their stuff not to her liking. Their porridge (whatever the hell that is) was either too hot or too cold and their mattresses too firm or too soft. She finally found porridge that was just right and a comfortable bed, just before the bears came home and ate her. Or something like that, but the point of my story is this: when it comes to the Porsche 911, previous models have either been too cold / soft for my tastes (911, 911 SC, Carrera, Carrera 4) or too hot / firm for my tastes (930, 911 GT3). Porsche’s new-for-2011 Carrera GTS, on the other hand, is just right.

Image: Porsche

I had a chance to drive it, albeit too briefly, at this weekend’s Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, and it’s the very first Porsche 911 that I really liked. Scratch that: it’s the first 911 that I absolutely loved, and I find myself wondering just how much kidneys go for on the black market. I’ve got two, and I really only need one, but I doubt that selling my own kidney to the highest bidder would cover the 911 Carrera GTS’ $113,000 price of admission. Still, it’s hard to believe that 30 minutes behind the wheel was all it took to make me a believer.

Image: Porsche

First, there’s the engine, which puts out 408 horsepower and makes one of the best exhaust notes to ever come out of Zuffenhausen. In terms of power, that’s 23 more than the 911 Carrera and 27 less than the 911 GT3. It pulls harder than you expect, nearly all the way to redline, and shifts from the six speed manual gearbox are superb. Clutch effort is light, and the car is as easy to drive in stop and go traffic as a Mazda MX-5. Punch up sport mode and find a break in traffic, and the Carrera GTS accelerates with enthusiasm. Zero to sixty comes up in about four seconds, and Porsche says that the tops speed is 190 miles per hour. I didn’t get a chance to verify that, but I see no reason to doubt them. Even the balance is the best I’ve experienced in a 911, with no trace of power on or lift-throttle oversteer.

Image: Porsche

The Carrera GTS even looks like a bit of a sleeper. From the outside, it’s easy to mistake it for a plain vanilla Carrera, and the subtle increase in stance is hard to see unless you’re parked next to a new Carrera. The Carrera GTS shares a body with the Carrera 4, which is nearly 1.75” wider than a standard Carrera. Like the Carrera, power goes to the rear wheels only, just as Ferdinand Porsche designed the platform some 45 years ago.

Image: Porsche

The 911 Carrera GTS may be the ideal blend of track day terror and daily driver, and for me it’s the first 911 that feels “just right”. Maybe if I can track down Goldilocks’ agent and get a book deal like she did, I can even afford to put one in the garage.



2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS: Goldilocks, Your Ride Is Here 14
Mar
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Favorite Cars, News, porsche, Porsche 911 Carrera GTS, Sports Cars on 03 14th, 2011

Image: Porsche

It’s been a long time since anyone read fairy tales to me, but here’s what I remember about Goldilocks: she did a B&E on the bear’s place and found most of their stuff not to her liking. Their porridge (whatever the hell that is) was either too hot or too cold and their mattresses too firm or too soft. She finally found porridge that was just right and a comfortable bed, just before the bears came home and ate her. Or something like that, but the point of my story is this: when it comes to the Porsche 911, previous models have either been too cold / soft for my tastes (911, 911 SC, Carrera, Carrera 4) or too hot / firm for my tastes (930, 911 GT3). Porsche’s new-for-2011 Carrera GTS, on the other hand, is just right.

Image: Porsche

I had a chance to drive it, albeit too briefly, at this weekend’s Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, and it’s the very first Porsche 911 that I really liked. Scratch that: it’s the first 911 that I absolutely loved, and I find myself wondering just how much kidneys go for on the black market. I’ve got two, and I really only need one, but I doubt that selling my own kidney to the highest bidder would cover the 911 Carrera GTS’ $113,000 price of admission. Still, it’s hard to believe that 30 minutes behind the wheel was all it took to make me a believer.

Image: Porsche

First, there’s the engine, which puts out 408 horsepower and makes one of the best exhaust notes to ever come out of Zuffenhausen. In terms of power, that’s 23 more than the 911 Carrera and 27 less than the 911 GT3. It pulls harder than you expect, nearly all the way to redline, and shifts from the six speed manual gearbox are superb. Clutch effort is light, and the car is as easy to drive in stop and go traffic as a Mazda MX-5. Punch up sport mode and find a break in traffic, and the Carrera GTS accelerates with enthusiasm. Zero to sixty comes up in about four seconds, and Porsche says that the tops speed is 190 miles per hour. I didn’t get a chance to verify that, but I see no reason to doubt them. Even the balance is the best I’ve experienced in a 911, with no trace of power on or lift-throttle oversteer.

Image: Porsche

The Carrera GTS even looks like a bit of a sleeper. From the outside, it’s easy to mistake it for a plain vanilla Carrera, and the subtle increase in stance is hard to see unless you’re parked next to a new Carrera. The Carrera GTS shares a body with the Carrera 4, which is nearly 1.75” wider than a standard Carrera. Like the Carrera, power goes to the rear wheels only, just as Ferdinand Porsche designed the platform some 45 years ago.

Image: Porsche

The 911 Carrera GTS may be the ideal blend of track day terror and daily driver, and for me it’s the first 911 that feels “just right”. Maybe if I can track down Goldilocks’ agent and get a book deal like she did, I can even afford to put one in the garage.







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