100 Hot Cars

Just Car Blog

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Review & Test Drive 29
Jan
Posted by Harvey Schwartz in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, SRT, Test Drives on 01 29th, 2013
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Right Wide Done Small

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Right Wide Done Small

‘ONE MORE INVITATION TO RUMBLE’

Word has it that 2013 will be the last year for the Dodge Challenger SRT8 as Dodge and SRT are getting ready to introduce a new model for 2014, the all-new SRT Barracuda that will be sleeker and pack an even more powerful punch.

First introduced in 2008, the all-new Challenger SRT turned heads with its retro-styling featuring a flat black grille with satin-chrome surround and SRT badge, round headlamps including HID lights, lower air-intake with round foglamps at the sides, and a giant black splitter with integrated front fender spats down below.  The power-dome hood features two working air-scoops.  From the side are steeply raked A-pillars, oval/heated sideview mirrors, pull-out door handles, polished aluminum fuel filler door, arrow head rear window, and fenders stuffed with 20X9 inch aluminum alloy wheels.  The rear shows it’s retro-styling with a straight-line of lamp clusters, a deck lid spoiler with the SRT8 badge proudly displayed, and 2.75 inch exhaust pipes ending with four-inch wide rectangular dual exhaust tips at the sides down below.  The SRT tuned exhaust rumbles when you push the start button and growls loudly when pressing hard on the throttle.  It’s beautiful music to my ears.  At first look you think that you are looking at an original 1970 thru 1974 Dodge Challenger.  Unique 392 HEMI badges are fitted on both front fenders flaunting its new historically significant V8 engine that remains true to its high-performance roots and powers the highest rated Challenger ever.

The 392 cu.in. 6.4 liter HEMI V8 makes 470 hp at 6,000 rpm and 470 lb.ft. of torque at 4,200 rpm.  The torque band is extremely flat allowing for strong launch and improved straight-line performance throughout the rpm range.  The advanced active intake manifold along with its high-lift cam with phasing provides maximum low-end torque and high-end power while still delivering 23mpg on the highway with the six-speed manual.  The performance-tuned engine mounts improve idle stability and ride control at all speeds.

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Engine Side View Done Small

New this year is the expanded adaptive damping suspension that allows for three-mode selectable suspension tuning, a standard launch control that provides enhanced straight-line acceleration and an optional, (my Challenger SRT came with it) monster Harman Kardon audio system with 18-GreenEdge speakers and 900 watts of power that shook the inside when just at half power.  A look under the hood reveals unique valve covers with painted silver ribs and the ‘392 HEMI’ logo, which gives the engine a unique, clean and aggressive look.

My test Challenger SRT8 came equipped with the Tremec TR-6060 six-speed manual transmission and a ZF-Sachs 24mm dual-disc high-performance clutch-a proven performer that was first offered on the 2008 Dodge Viper SRT10.  The triple-cone 1st./2nd and double cone 3rd.-6th synchronized gear design makes short precise gear changes up and down for fun and thrills as you zoom to 60mph from a standstill in just 4.6 seconds, run the ¼ mile in the mid 12 second range, go from 0-100-9 in the low 15 seconds, and reach a top speed of 182mph.  That’s fast, very fast!  Putting all of the ground-shaking torque to the pavement is a standard Getrag limited-slip differential.

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Side LA Done Small

New for 2013 is an improved adaptive damping suspension (ADS) system that is    tuned specifically for the Challenger SRT8 to provide an everyday performance ride or a much firmer race track capable damping for more challenging driving situations.  In ‘Auto’ mode, a wide range of on-road and driver-inputs-such as vehicle speed, steering angle, steering speed, brake torque, throttle position and longitudinal/lateral/vertical accelerations-automatically tune the suspension for specific conditions.  In ‘Sport’ mode, the damping system rebound and compression is locked to a higher rate.  You can easily choose between setting with a press of a button on the center stack to quickly change the shock damping characteristics from ‘Auto’ for everyday commuting to ‘Sport’ for more spirited driving situations.  You can really feel the difference in damping forces when you switch from Auto to Sport modes.  The automatic transmission with paddle shifters comes with a ‘Track’ mode that further increases the damping for track use only.   In either mode you are riding on rails!

The SRT’s unique suspension is fully independent with an SRT tuned sport ride that is compliant and never harsh.  The front SLA (short/long arm) setup also includes high upper ‘A’ arms, coil springs over gas-charged monotube Bilstein shocks, a 30mm solid stabilizer bar and lateral and diagonal lower links.  The rear features a 5-link setup with coil springs, link-type 16mm stabilizer bar, gas-charged monotube Bilstein shocks and an isolated suspension cradle for extra rigidity and less noise, vibration and harshness.  The front suspension also benefits from a strut tower brace located just behind the engine to further increase the front ends rigidity and giving you ‘racecar’ super-quick handling characteristics.  The SRT tuned rack & pinion hydraulic assisted steering uses a heavy-duty pump and unique gearing to give you a more direct feel and on center response that further adds to the pinpoint accuracy and speed of the reaction to your inputs.  Straightline stability is superb and when you are tackling steep curving roads it is no problem with the standard traction control/electronic stability control.  If you want to let the rear slid out for even more aggressive speeds through the curves you can shut off the system.  The optimum 44.6/45.4 front/rear weight distribution is ideal and gives the car a more neutral feel during spirited driving time. The handling result is .90g capability on the skid pad-the most of any production Challenger and on par with some of the world’s best-handling performance coupes.

Sitting  ½ inch lower than non-SRT models, the Challenger SRT8 392 rides on standard five-spoke 20X9 inch lightweight forged aluminum wheels with satin black painted pockets and SRT engraved on each wheel.  These unique wheels are wrapped with Goodyear 245/45ZR20 inch front and 255/45ZR20 inch rear F1 Supercar tires for excellent grip and a very quiet and smooth ride.

A new for 2013 standard launch control system helps maximize straight-line acceleration.  Using the manual six-speed transmission, when the vehicle is at a complete stop, you engage the system by pressing the ESC button twice and then depress the clutch and quickly apply full throttle.  Launch control holds the engine at the desired rpm and waits for you to release the clutch.  Through the SRT-exclusive Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) screen, you can adjust the launch rpm from 2,500-4,500 in 250 rpm increments, allowing for optimal launches in various conditions.  Launch control then uses engine torque management to achieve controlled wheelslip for maximum acceleration up to 62mph.  The feeling is like being shot out of a cannon.

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Rear Done Small

Quickly and safely slowing the 4,170 pound Challenger SRT8 down from speed are ‘world-class’ power-assisted brakes that bring the car from 60 to 0mph in just 117 feet.  Up front are 14.2 inch vented/slotted rotors and 13.8 inch vented/slotted rotors in the rear.  Each disc is clamped with Brembo four-piston fixed calipers painted red in aluminum housing.  The three-mode electronic stability control system with knockback mitigation also includes ABS, BA, EBD and Hill-Start Assist so you won’t roll back when stopped on a hill.  The Ready Alert Braking system anticipates when you quickly release the accelerator pedal and may initiate an emergency brake stop, after which the electronic stability control pump engages to set brake pads against rotors in order to decrease the time required for full brake application.  Improved brake cooling and fade performance comes from the brake cooling ducts cut out on the big front splitter that directs air to the front brakes.

The new 2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 is awesome in every respect under the skin of the retro-modern body but even more excellence and attention to detail lies inside the comfortable and sporty interior.  It begins with SRT designed front bucket seats are perforated and deeply cut to keep you in place during very spirited driving.  My test car came with power bottom, power lumbar support and manual seatback.  The SRT-exclusive leather-wrapped/heated steering wheel features a unique satin chrome rim section with a flattened bottom surface that showcases the SRT logo.  All audio controls, cruise control Bluetooth and EVIC controls are accessible from the horizontal spokes of the steering wheel.  The horizontal instrument cluster features four chromed accent rings and unique SRT graphics for the large 180mph speedometer and 8,000rpm tachometer plus smaller fuel and engine coolant temperature gauges that are all easy to see.  Inside the cluster the EVIC with performance pages provides you with trip information, multimedia information from the Media Center radio, along with instant feedback on 0-60mph time, 60-0 mph braking, G-forces, 1/8 mile and quarter-mile times.  All of the touch points are made from high-quality soft materials.  The door trim features suede leather and double-stitched leather.  The SRT bucket seat backs are embroidered with the SRT logo.  Sporty cues include aluminum foot pedals with rubber inserts; a perfectly placed real ‘pistol grip’ stick shifter wrapped in leather with an aluminum center surrounded with chrome ringed bezel.  For safe nighttime driving is standard ambient lighting for the chrome door handles and dual cupholders that is also ringed with aluminum trim.  The center stack features easy-to-use chrome dials for the climate control system.  My test Challenger SRT8 came with the monster Harman Kardon premium audio surround-sound system with 900-watts, 18-GreenEdge speakers and amplifier technology to offer superior sound quality and high Sound Level outputs with minimum energy consumption.  The system’s 18-GreenEdge ultra-lightweight, high-efficiency speakers include seven 3.5 inch Unity coaxial mid-range speakers with seven integrated tweeters located in the front dash, rear doors and rear deck, two 6X9 inch subwoofers located in the front doors, and two 10-inch subwoofers in a trunk mounted enclosure.

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Cockpit Done Small

Standard equipment not mentioned above includes heated front seats, rear 60/40 folding seat with a pull down armrest and dual cupholders, a grab handle above the passenger door, express down front windows, storage slots in each door, ParkSense rear park assist system, keyless go push button start/stop, keyless entry, auto dimming rearview mirrors, variable speed wipers/washers, remote trunk release, universal garage door opener, aluminum plate door guard with Challenger engraved, a sunglass holder and dual map lights above, dual lighted vanity mirrors, a 6.5 inch touch screen display, a Uconnect 340 audio system with AM-FM-Sirius satellite radio/CD/DVD/MP3/HDD with six Boston Acoustics speakers, a 12-volt plug up front, thick cut-pile carpeting with custom floor mats.  My test Challenger SRT8 came with a GPS navigation system, Redline 3-coat pearl exterior paint and dual silver center stripes that really stopped traffic with drivers asking “how much horsepower’, etc.

Standard safety features not mentioned above includes advanced multistage front airbags, supplemental side curtain front and rear airbags, front row active head restraints, driver’s knee airbag, front seat-mounted side thorax airbags, 3-point safety belts for five people with front pretensioners/load limiters, security alarm, engine immobilizer, LATCH system.

The new 2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 is the real deal.  It has what every muscle car enthusiast wants in a modern, super-high-performance vehicle but with a unique retro look that brings back memories from the great years of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s.  Go-man-Go and drive it always for only $49,205.00 including delivery.  Thanks Dodge for a fun and thrilling test drive!

2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Right Wide Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Side LA Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Beauty Rear Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Wheel Tire Brake Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 Engine Badge Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Cockpit Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Cluster Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Front Seats Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Front Bucket Seat Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Sport Button Done Small
2013 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Engine Side View Done Small

COPYRIGHT: 2013: HARVEY SCHWARTZ

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Challenger SRT8 As-Tested $49,205
  • Engine: 6.4 liter HEMI V8 470 hp @ 6,000 rpm / 470 lb.ft. of torque @ 4,200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116 inches
  • Total length: 197.7 inches
  • Total width: 75.7 inches
  • Total height: 57.1 inches
  • Track: f/r-63/63.1 inches
  • Ground clearance: 4.8 inches
  • Curb weight: 4,170 pounds
  • Fuel tank: 19 gallons
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4 inches
  • Legroom: f/r-42/32.6 inches
  • Cargo volume: 16.2 cu.ft.
  • EPA mileage: 14mpg/city, 23mpg/highway
  • 0-60 mph: 4.6 seconds


2013 Dodge Challenger Supercharged Caught Testing 17
Oct
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, News, SRT, SRT Barracuda on 10 17th, 2012

There is no doubt that the 470 horsepower Dodge Challenger SRT8 was literally left in the dust after the introduction of the new Chevy Camaro ZL1 and Ford Mustang Shelby GT500. While it was fair competition for this trio on a level playing field before the 580-hp ZL1 and newest 662-hp Shelby GT500, the Challenger, despite its hefty weight, was an able competitor. With rumors circulating that the SRT brand has something up their sleeves to put the Challenger back into the game with an honest chance, we are happy to reiterate Road and Track’s report of catching a new Challenger SRT8 392 testing while sporting a cover on the front fascia – possibly to cover up some mild changes for a long-awaited Supercharged variant of the Challenger SRT8.

From the spy photos, found on Road and Tracks post, we speculate that this could either be a supercharged Challenger SRT8 or maybe a mule for an upcoming Cuda, resting on the heels of our previous HEMI Cuda resurrection report.

Either way, it is likely that what we see in the spy shots has something all-new under the hood with some more power. It would only make sense, while the horsepower wars are allowed to commence before strict EPA regulations put an end to the fun, that SRT have one last hoorah for the American muscle car battle with something that will at least keep up with its direct competition. We are sure to see something come out of these spy shots during the 2013 Detroit Auto Show in a few months. Stay tuned!



It’s Not Just a Brand – SRT Family Ties Promo Video Shows-Off Their Five SRT Vehicles 11
Oct
Posted by Darryl in 2013 SRT Viper, Automotive, Chrysler, Chrysler 300 SRT8, Dodge, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Charger SRT8, Jeep, Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8, SRT, SRT8, video on 10 11th, 2012

The SRT group of vehicles has literally made a name and definitive brand for themselves. As Chrysler’s Street and Racing Technology group, SRT prides themselves in producing the highest output street vehicles for the Chrysler corporation (Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8, Dodge Charger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Chrysler 300 SRT8, SRT Viper). A new promo video titled “SRT Family Ties”, is a coalescence of all 5 new SRT branded vehicles expressing their heart-felt enthusiastic passion for the performance automotive world. To conclude the true SRT-expression, the video features the latest and greatest product to wear the SRT badge, the all-new SRT Viper. Enjoy the video!



Details Emerge on 2015 SRT Barracuda As Replacement for Dodge Challenger 24
Sep
Posted by Darryl in Automotive, Chrysler, Dodge, Dodge Barracuda, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, Fiat, News, SRT, SRT Barracuda on 09 24th, 2012

Speculative Rendering: Jon Sibal

Chrysler, with their newfound joint efforts at Fiat, is set to make additional changes to the lineup to appease the main-stream and enthusiast segments. The latest details to emerge from Chrysler are plans to introduce a 2015 Barracuda to first join the SRT line of vehicles ultimately replacing the current Dodge Challenger. The Barracuda will join the SRT Viper’s paved outlet for a more common-placed performance vehicle.

The Dodge Challenger, built on Chrysler’s LX platform (incl. Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger, Dodge Magnum) is undeniably a big vehicle carrying around some serious heft to it. With the automotive market moving towards more efficient vehicles, the ideal decision would be to scale down these vehicles and that is where a new Barracuda would come into place to be the successor for the Challenger.

Speculative Rendering: Jon Sibal

With the strong and growing alliance of Chrysler and Fiat, the companies have a wider range of platforms to share. Yet Chrysler is still using platform setups derived from the Benz E-Class on their LX platform, the Fiat brand has been on the search for rear-drive offerings, from Alfa Romeo, Lancia and Maserati, which could easily be a choice replacement to ultimately underpin the new Barracuda.

The new Barracuda, set to initially be an SRT-branded vehicle, will be the first of a new generation of rear-wheel-drive Chrysler vehicles. Engine choices could start with force-fed 4-cylinders, maybe a direct-injection V6, and top out with the infamous 5.7 or 6.4-liter HEMI V8 engines. The 2015 Cuda is expected to lose over 6 inches of the Challenger’s wheelbase. Width is expected to be down about 2 inches while the vehicle will weigh in about 250 to 300 pounds less.

Having a smaller footprint and lighter weight, the new Cuda could be a candidate for export further expanding the Chrysler SRT brand’s reach.

[source: Car and Driver  / images: Jon Sibal]



2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Review – An All-American Gun Show 20
Apr
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, SRT, Test Drives on 04 20th, 2012

When it comes to an American muscle car icon, the Dodge Challenger aspires to bring its original styling to the forefront in an easily recognizable new retro skin. The excitement does not stop there. The new 2012 Challenger SRT8 touts a serious punch in the form of a 470 horsepower 470 ft. lbs. of torque 392 HEMI V8 engine.

For model year 2012, the new Challenger SRT8 gets just a few changes such as a new Sport mode and flat-bottom sports steering wheel. Just like the other 2012 SRT vehicles, the Street and Race Technology division incorporates new adjustable dampers to turn the husky chassis into a more-capable GT sports car on the lateral acceleration charts.

Having tested the 2011 Challenger SRT8 392 last year with a 6-speed manual transmission, I became familiar with the monstrous proportions of power that this vehicle is capable of. For this year, the 2012 Challenger SRT8 392 with a 5-speed automatic transmission found its way into my garage.  To my surprise, there is not much of a contrast between the two. Other than different gear ratios and the obvious torque converter sapping what seemed to be only a miniscule amount of power to the rear wheels, things are kept virtually the same.

The 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 in a slush-box (auto transmission) flavor may just be the choice for the light-hearted enthusiast. Considering how technology is out-driving the purist these days, it is no wonder that automakers of the finest sports cars have just about eliminated manual transmissions in their lineup. Dodge uses their proven 5-speed auto tranny, which is plenty capable of handling the massive HEMI power. The same unit is found in the 2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8 and Charger SRT8, which I had the pleasure of reviewing late last year. The manual shift paddles mounted on the steering wheel prove to be useful when you want to get the full grunt out of the HEMI at low RPMs. However, there is a slight delay in shifts at times especially when you reach near redline. In other words, it is best to let the computer handle the shifts when stretching the extremely tall gear cogs. The gearing is even tall enough to run 2nd gear all the way up to 75 mph… perfectly fine because the HEMI V8 has a wide power band.

The new sport mode feature, one of the few changes for the 2012 model year, is an essential part of keeping all 4,200+ pounds in check. Sport mode primarily stiffens up the dampers to levels that could almost rattle your teeth out of your mouth. To my surprise, sport mode turns the Challenger into a different animal, entirely changing its handling abilities. The difference in sport mode on or off is basically night and day. The rear end tends to sloppily flop around without the help of sport mode’s extra-stepped valve setting via the active dampened Bilstein shocks. Luckily, in the default non-sport mode, the Challenger SRT8 cooperates nicely on the highway serving as a nice touring machine with a ride similar to the Chrysler 300C or Dodge Charger R/T. Additionally, Sport mode holds the transmission in higher gears longer anticipating spirited driving. Expect to considerably lower the MPG figures from the EPA estimated 14 mpg city and 22 mpg highway to something well south of 13 mpg when in sport mode and having a heavy right-foot at the same time.

Automatic transmission equipped Challenger SRT8 models receive the Fuel Saver option, which uses intelligent cylinder deactivation where only 4-cylinders are fired under light loads. The computer, unfortunately, recognizes ‘light loads’ as nearly coasting or maintaining a constant speed on a perfectly level road. Cylinder deactivation is very noticeable as the exhaust note changes to a monotone hum and you take notice to a little extra vibration. Once all 8-cylinders kick back in, you hear an abrupt thump from the exhaust and the subtle vibrations from 4-cylinder mode tend to dissipate.

The 2012 Challenger SRT8’s interior remains mostly unchanged from last year except for the new flat-bottom steering wheel. The seats are well proportioned and bolstered just enough to comply with the Challenger’s handling capabilities. The padded dashboard and instrument cluster are specific to the Challenger while the center stack controls/buttons and touch-screen audio/connectivity LCD screen remains customary to older Chrysler/Dodge vehicles.

There is no denying that the Challenger is a big vehicle. If the highway-floating 4,200+ pounds of Detroit muscle does not give away its shear size, then the virtually endless proportions of front seating room will. Keep in mind, you can get 5 adults in the Challenger but at the expense of the middle rear-seat occupant ‘ridding the hump’ where the drive shaft runs to the limited-slip differential.

Lighting up the rear tires is virtually a cinch. Just lay into the right peddle and let the plumes of smoke build to your heart’s content, or at least until the rear 255/45 20-inch Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber ceases to exist.

The Dodge Challenger’s styling is definitely an eye turner. For those who remember the original Challenger, or maybe caught a few episodes of The Dukes of Hazard -mistaking the old Charger for a Challenger, will take pride in the Challenger’s exterior proportions and design lines. The SRT8 version of the Challenger takes things to an extreme level with 20-inch forged wheels, 4-piston Brembo caliper brakes up front with 2-pistion in the rear, an aggressive stance, black front splitter and a rear spoiler. To sum it up nicely, the 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 is simply bad ass looking. It is like an American heritage fest with unlimited beer and a city-wide ban on wine. No wimpy stuff here, just a HEMI-muscle gun show.

Pricing for the new 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI starts at a reasonable $43,995 but can easily tack on a couple grand from the short options list.

2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-3
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-1
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-2
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-side
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-angle
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-wheel-tire
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-fuel-door
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-hemi-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-cluster
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-dashboard
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-front-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Challenger SRT8 $43,995
  • Engine: 6.4-liter V8 HEMI 392 470 horsepower @ 6000 rpm / 470 ft-lbs. torque @ 4200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116.0in.
  • Total length: 197.7in.
  • Total width: 75.7in.
  • Total height: 57.1in.
  • Track: f/r-63.0/63.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4in.
  • Legroom: f/r-42.0/32.6in.
  • Cargo volume: 16.2cu.ft.
  • 0-60mph: 4.5 seconds
  • EPA mileage est.: 14 mpg city / 22 mpg highway (automatic transmission)
  • Fuel tank: 19.1 gallons
  • Curb weight: 4,203 lbs.


2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Review – An All-American Gun Show 20
Apr
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, SRT, Test Drives on 04 20th, 2012

When it comes to an American muscle car icon, the Dodge Challenger aspires to bring its original styling to the forefront in an easily recognizable new retro skin. The excitement does not stop there. The new 2012 Challenger SRT8 touts a serious punch in the form of a 470 horsepower 470 ft. lbs. of torque 392 HEMI V8 engine.

For model year 2012, the new Challenger SRT8 gets just a few changes such as a new Sport mode and flat-bottom sports steering wheel. Just like the other 2012 SRT vehicles, the Street and Race Technology division incorporates new adjustable dampers to turn the husky chassis into a more-capable GT sports car on the lateral acceleration charts.

Having tested the 2011 Challenger SRT8 392 last year with a 6-speed manual transmission, I became familiar with the monstrous proportions of power that this vehicle is capable of. For this year, the 2012 Challenger SRT8 392 with a 5-speed automatic transmission found its way into my garage.  To my surprise, there is not much of a contrast between the two. Other than different gear ratios and the obvious torque converter sapping what seemed to be only a miniscule amount of power to the rear wheels, things are kept virtually the same.

The 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 in a slush-box (auto transmission) flavor may just be the choice for the light-hearted enthusiast. Considering how technology is out-driving the purist these days, it is no wonder that automakers of the finest sports cars have just about eliminated manual transmissions in their lineup. Dodge uses their proven 5-speed auto tranny, which is plenty capable of handling the massive HEMI power. The same unit is found in the 2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8 and Charger SRT8, which I had the pleasure of reviewing late last year. The manual shift paddles mounted on the steering wheel prove to be useful when you want to get the full grunt out of the HEMI at low RPMs. However, there is a slight delay in shifts at times especially when you reach near redline. In other words, it is best to let the computer handle the shifts when stretching the extremely tall gear cogs. The gearing is even tall enough to run 2nd gear all the way up to 75 mph… perfectly fine because the HEMI V8 has a wide power band.

The new sport mode feature, one of the few changes for the 2012 model year, is an essential part of keeping all 4,200+ pounds in check. Sport mode primarily stiffens up the dampers to levels that could almost rattle your teeth out of your mouth. To my surprise, sport mode turns the Challenger into a different animal, entirely changing its handling abilities. The difference in sport mode on or off is basically night and day. The rear end tends to sloppily flop around without the help of sport mode’s extra-stepped valve setting via the active dampened Bilstein shocks. Luckily, in the default non-sport mode, the Challenger SRT8 cooperates nicely on the highway serving as a nice touring machine with a ride similar to the Chrysler 300C or Dodge Charger R/T. Additionally, Sport mode holds the transmission in higher gears longer anticipating spirited driving. Expect to considerably lower the MPG figures from the EPA estimated 14 mpg city and 22 mpg highway to something well south of 13 mpg when in sport mode and having a heavy right-foot at the same time.

Automatic transmission equipped Challenger SRT8 models receive the Fuel Saver option, which uses intelligent cylinder deactivation where only 4-cylinders are fired under light loads. The computer, unfortunately, recognizes ‘light loads’ as nearly coasting or maintaining a constant speed on a perfectly level road. Cylinder deactivation is very noticeable as the exhaust note changes to a monotone hum and you take notice to a little extra vibration. Once all 8-cylinders kick back in, you hear an abrupt thump from the exhaust and the subtle vibrations from 4-cylinder mode tend to dissipate.

The 2012 Challenger SRT8’s interior remains mostly unchanged from last year except for the new flat-bottom steering wheel. The seats are well proportioned and bolstered just enough to comply with the Challenger’s handling capabilities. The padded dashboard and instrument cluster are specific to the Challenger while the center stack controls/buttons and touch-screen audio/connectivity LCD screen remains customary to older Chrysler/Dodge vehicles.

There is no denying that the Challenger is a big vehicle. If the highway-floating 4,200+ pounds of Detroit muscle does not give away its shear size, then the virtually endless proportions of front seating room will. Keep in mind, you can get 5 adults in the Challenger but at the expense of the middle rear-seat occupant ‘ridding the hump’ where the drive shaft runs to the limited-slip differential.

Lighting up the rear tires is virtually a cinch. Just lay into the right peddle and let the plumes of smoke build to your heart’s content, or at least until the rear 255/45 20-inch Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber ceases to exist.

The Dodge Challenger’s styling is definitely an eye turner. For those who remember the original Challenger, or maybe caught a few episodes of The Dukes of Hazard -mistaking the old Charger for a Challenger, will take pride in the Challenger’s exterior proportions and design lines. The SRT8 version of the Challenger takes things to an extreme level with 20-inch forged wheels, 4-piston Brembo caliper brakes up front with 2-pistion in the rear, an aggressive stance, black front splitter and a rear spoiler. To sum it up nicely, the 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 is simply bad ass looking. It is like an American heritage fest with unlimited beer and a city-wide ban on wine. No wimpy stuff here, just a HEMI-muscle gun show.

Pricing for the new 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI starts at a reasonable $43,995 but can easily tack on a couple grand from the short options list.

2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-3
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-1
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-2
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-side
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-angle
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-wheel-tire
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-fuel-door
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-hemi-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-cluster
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-dashboard
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-front-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Challenger SRT8 $43,995
  • Engine: 6.4-liter V8 HEMI 392 470 horsepower @ 6000 rpm / 470 ft-lbs. torque @ 4200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116.0in.
  • Total length: 197.7in.
  • Total width: 75.7in.
  • Total height: 57.1in.
  • Track: f/r-63.0/63.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4in.
  • Legroom: f/r-42.0/32.6in.
  • Cargo volume: 16.2cu.ft.
  • 0-60mph: 4.5 seconds
  • EPA mileage est.: 14 mpg city / 22 mpg highway (automatic transmission)
  • Fuel tank: 19.1 gallons
  • Curb weight: 4,203 lbs.


2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Review – An All-American Gun Show 20
Apr
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, SRT, Test Drives on 04 20th, 2012

When it comes to an American muscle car icon, the Dodge Challenger aspires to bring its original styling to the forefront in an easily recognizable new retro skin. The excitement does not stop there. The new 2012 Challenger SRT8 touts a serious punch in the form of a 470 horsepower 470 ft. lbs. of torque 392 HEMI V8 engine.

For model year 2012, the new Challenger SRT8 gets just a few changes such as a new Sport mode and flat-bottom sports steering wheel. Just like the other 2012 SRT vehicles, the Street and Race Technology division incorporates new adjustable dampers to turn the husky chassis into a more-capable GT sports car on the lateral acceleration charts.

Having tested the 2011 Challenger SRT8 392 last year with a 6-speed manual transmission, I became familiar with the monstrous proportions of power that this vehicle is capable of. For this year, the 2012 Challenger SRT8 392 with a 5-speed automatic transmission found its way into my garage.  To my surprise, there is not much of a contrast between the two. Other than different gear ratios and the obvious torque converter sapping what seemed to be only a miniscule amount of power to the rear wheels, things are kept virtually the same.

The 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 in a slush-box (auto transmission) flavor may just be the choice for the light-hearted enthusiast. Considering how technology is out-driving the purist these days, it is no wonder that automakers of the finest sports cars have just about eliminated manual transmissions in their lineup. Dodge uses their proven 5-speed auto tranny, which is plenty capable of handling the massive HEMI power. The same unit is found in the 2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8 and Charger SRT8, which I had the pleasure of reviewing late last year. The manual shift paddles mounted on the steering wheel prove to be useful when you want to get the full grunt out of the HEMI at low RPMs. However, there is a slight delay in shifts at times especially when you reach near redline. In other words, it is best to let the computer handle the shifts when stretching the extremely tall gear cogs. The gearing is even tall enough to run 2nd gear all the way up to 75 mph… perfectly fine because the HEMI V8 has a wide power band.

The new sport mode feature, one of the few changes for the 2012 model year, is an essential part of keeping all 4,200+ pounds in check. Sport mode primarily stiffens up the dampers to levels that could almost rattle your teeth out of your mouth. To my surprise, sport mode turns the Challenger into a different animal, entirely changing its handling abilities. The difference in sport mode on or off is basically night and day. The rear end tends to sloppily flop around without the help of sport mode’s extra-stepped valve setting via the active dampened Bilstein shocks. Luckily, in the default non-sport mode, the Challenger SRT8 cooperates nicely on the highway serving as a nice touring machine with a ride similar to the Chrysler 300C or Dodge Charger R/T. Additionally, Sport mode holds the transmission in higher gears longer anticipating spirited driving. Expect to considerably lower the MPG figures from the EPA estimated 14 mpg city and 22 mpg highway to something well south of 13 mpg when in sport mode and having a heavy right-foot at the same time.

Automatic transmission equipped Challenger SRT8 models receive the Fuel Saver option, which uses intelligent cylinder deactivation where only 4-cylinders are fired under light loads. The computer, unfortunately, recognizes ‘light loads’ as nearly coasting or maintaining a constant speed on a perfectly level road. Cylinder deactivation is very noticeable as the exhaust note changes to a monotone hum and you take notice to a little extra vibration. Once all 8-cylinders kick back in, you hear an abrupt thump from the exhaust and the subtle vibrations from 4-cylinder mode tend to dissipate.

The 2012 Challenger SRT8’s interior remains mostly unchanged from last year except for the new flat-bottom steering wheel. The seats are well proportioned and bolstered just enough to comply with the Challenger’s handling capabilities. The padded dashboard and instrument cluster are specific to the Challenger while the center stack controls/buttons and touch-screen audio/connectivity LCD screen remains customary to older Chrysler/Dodge vehicles.

There is no denying that the Challenger is a big vehicle. If the highway-floating 4,200+ pounds of Detroit muscle does not give away its shear size, then the virtually endless proportions of front seating room will. Keep in mind, you can get 5 adults in the Challenger but at the expense of the middle rear-seat occupant ‘ridding the hump’ where the drive shaft runs to the limited-slip differential.

Lighting up the rear tires is virtually a cinch. Just lay into the right peddle and let the plumes of smoke build to your heart’s content, or at least until the rear 255/45 20-inch Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber ceases to exist.

The Dodge Challenger’s styling is definitely an eye turner. For those who remember the original Challenger, or maybe caught a few episodes of The Dukes of Hazard -mistaking the old Charger for a Challenger, will take pride in the Challenger’s exterior proportions and design lines. The SRT8 version of the Challenger takes things to an extreme level with 20-inch forged wheels, 4-piston Brembo caliper brakes up front with 2-pistion in the rear, an aggressive stance, black front splitter and a rear spoiler. To sum it up nicely, the 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 is simply bad ass looking. It is like an American heritage fest with unlimited beer and a city-wide ban on wine. No wimpy stuff here, just a HEMI-muscle gun show.

Pricing for the new 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI starts at a reasonable $43,995 but can easily tack on a couple grand from the short options list.

2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-3
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-1
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-2
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-side
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-angle
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-wheel-tire
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-fuel-door
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-hemi-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-cluster
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-dashboard
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-front-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Challenger SRT8 $43,995
  • Engine: 6.4-liter V8 HEMI 392 470 horsepower @ 6000 rpm / 470 ft-lbs. torque @ 4200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116.0in.
  • Total length: 197.7in.
  • Total width: 75.7in.
  • Total height: 57.1in.
  • Track: f/r-63.0/63.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4in.
  • Legroom: f/r-42.0/32.6in.
  • Cargo volume: 16.2cu.ft.
  • 0-60mph: 4.5 seconds
  • EPA mileage est.: 14 mpg city / 22 mpg highway (automatic transmission)
  • Fuel tank: 19.1 gallons
  • Curb weight: 4,203 lbs.


2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Review – An All-American Gun Show 20
Apr
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, SRT, Test Drives on 04 20th, 2012

When it comes to an American muscle car icon, the Dodge Challenger aspires to bring its original styling to the forefront in an easily recognizable new retro skin. The excitement does not stop there. The new 2012 Challenger SRT8 touts a serious punch in the form of a 470 horsepower 470 ft. lbs. of torque 392 HEMI V8 engine.

For model year 2012, the new Challenger SRT8 gets just a few changes such as a new Sport mode and flat-bottom sports steering wheel. Just like the other 2012 SRT vehicles, the Street and Race Technology division incorporates new adjustable dampers to turn the husky chassis into a more-capable GT sports car on the lateral acceleration charts.

Having tested the 2011 Challenger SRT8 392 last year with a 6-speed manual transmission, I became familiar with the monstrous proportions of power that this vehicle is capable of. For this year, the 2012 Challenger SRT8 392 with a 5-speed automatic transmission found its way into my garage.  To my surprise, there is not much of a contrast between the two. Other than different gear ratios and the obvious torque converter sapping what seemed to be only a miniscule amount of power to the rear wheels, things are kept virtually the same.

The 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 in a slush-box (auto transmission) flavor may just be the choice for the light-hearted enthusiast. Considering how technology is out-driving the purist these days, it is no wonder that automakers of the finest sports cars have just about eliminated manual transmissions in their lineup. Dodge uses their proven 5-speed auto tranny, which is plenty capable of handling the massive HEMI power. The same unit is found in the 2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8 and Charger SRT8, which I had the pleasure of reviewing late last year. The manual shift paddles mounted on the steering wheel prove to be useful when you want to get the full grunt out of the HEMI at low RPMs. However, there is a slight delay in shifts at times especially when you reach near redline. In other words, it is best to let the computer handle the shifts when stretching the extremely tall gear cogs. The gearing is even tall enough to run 2nd gear all the way up to 75 mph… perfectly fine because the HEMI V8 has a wide power band.

The new sport mode feature, one of the few changes for the 2012 model year, is an essential part of keeping all 4,200+ pounds in check. Sport mode primarily stiffens up the dampers to levels that could almost rattle your teeth out of your mouth. To my surprise, sport mode turns the Challenger into a different animal, entirely changing its handling abilities. The difference in sport mode on or off is basically night and day. The rear end tends to sloppily flop around without the help of sport mode’s extra-stepped valve setting via the active dampened Bilstein shocks. Luckily, in the default non-sport mode, the Challenger SRT8 cooperates nicely on the highway serving as a nice touring machine with a ride similar to the Chrysler 300C or Dodge Charger R/T. Additionally, Sport mode holds the transmission in higher gears longer anticipating spirited driving. Expect to considerably lower the MPG figures from the EPA estimated 14 mpg city and 22 mpg highway to something well south of 13 mpg when in sport mode and having a heavy right-foot at the same time.

Automatic transmission equipped Challenger SRT8 models receive the Fuel Saver option, which uses intelligent cylinder deactivation where only 4-cylinders are fired under light loads. The computer, unfortunately, recognizes ‘light loads’ as nearly coasting or maintaining a constant speed on a perfectly level road. Cylinder deactivation is very noticeable as the exhaust note changes to a monotone hum and you take notice to a little extra vibration. Once all 8-cylinders kick back in, you hear an abrupt thump from the exhaust and the subtle vibrations from 4-cylinder mode tend to dissipate.

The 2012 Challenger SRT8’s interior remains mostly unchanged from last year except for the new flat-bottom steering wheel. The seats are well proportioned and bolstered just enough to comply with the Challenger’s handling capabilities. The padded dashboard and instrument cluster are specific to the Challenger while the center stack controls/buttons and touch-screen audio/connectivity LCD screen remains customary to older Chrysler/Dodge vehicles.

There is no denying that the Challenger is a big vehicle. If the highway-floating 4,200+ pounds of Detroit muscle does not give away its shear size, then the virtually endless proportions of front seating room will. Keep in mind, you can get 5 adults in the Challenger but at the expense of the middle rear-seat occupant ‘ridding the hump’ where the drive shaft runs to the limited-slip differential.

Lighting up the rear tires is virtually a cinch. Just lay into the right peddle and let the plumes of smoke build to your heart’s content, or at least until the rear 255/45 20-inch Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber ceases to exist.

The Dodge Challenger’s styling is definitely an eye turner. For those who remember the original Challenger, or maybe caught a few episodes of The Dukes of Hazard -mistaking the old Charger for a Challenger, will take pride in the Challenger’s exterior proportions and design lines. The SRT8 version of the Challenger takes things to an extreme level with 20-inch forged wheels, 4-piston Brembo caliper brakes up front with 2-pistion in the rear, an aggressive stance, black front splitter and a rear spoiler. To sum it up nicely, the 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 is simply bad ass looking. It is like an American heritage fest with unlimited beer and a city-wide ban on wine. No wimpy stuff here, just a HEMI-muscle gun show.

Pricing for the new 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI starts at a reasonable $43,995 but can easily tack on a couple grand from the short options list.

2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-3
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-1
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-2
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-side
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-angle
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-wheel-tire
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-fuel-door
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-hemi-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-cluster
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-dashboard
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-front-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Challenger SRT8 $43,995
  • Engine: 6.4-liter V8 HEMI 392 470 horsepower @ 6000 rpm / 470 ft-lbs. torque @ 4200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116.0in.
  • Total length: 197.7in.
  • Total width: 75.7in.
  • Total height: 57.1in.
  • Track: f/r-63.0/63.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4in.
  • Legroom: f/r-42.0/32.6in.
  • Cargo volume: 16.2cu.ft.
  • 0-60mph: 4.5 seconds
  • EPA mileage est.: 14 mpg city / 22 mpg highway (automatic transmission)
  • Fuel tank: 19.1 gallons
  • Curb weight: 4,203 lbs.


2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Review – An All-American Gun Show 20
Apr
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, SRT, Test Drives on 04 20th, 2012

When it comes to an American muscle car icon, the Dodge Challenger aspires to bring its original styling to the forefront in an easily recognizable new retro skin. The excitement does not stop there. The new 2012 Challenger SRT8 touts a serious punch in the form of a 470 horsepower 470 ft. lbs. of torque 392 HEMI V8 engine.

For model year 2012, the new Challenger SRT8 gets just a few changes such as a new Sport mode and flat-bottom sports steering wheel. Just like the other 2012 SRT vehicles, the Street and Race Technology division incorporates new adjustable dampers to turn the husky chassis into a more-capable GT sports car on the lateral acceleration charts.

Having tested the 2011 Challenger SRT8 392 last year with a 6-speed manual transmission, I became familiar with the monstrous proportions of power that this vehicle is capable of. For this year, the 2012 Challenger SRT8 392 with a 5-speed automatic transmission found its way into my garage.  To my surprise, there is not much of a contrast between the two. Other than different gear ratios and the obvious torque converter sapping what seemed to be only a miniscule amount of power to the rear wheels, things are kept virtually the same.

The 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 in a slush-box (auto transmission) flavor may just be the choice for the light-hearted enthusiast. Considering how technology is out-driving the purist these days, it is no wonder that automakers of the finest sports cars have just about eliminated manual transmissions in their lineup. Dodge uses their proven 5-speed auto tranny, which is plenty capable of handling the massive HEMI power. The same unit is found in the 2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8 and Charger SRT8, which I had the pleasure of reviewing late last year. The manual shift paddles mounted on the steering wheel prove to be useful when you want to get the full grunt out of the HEMI at low RPMs. However, there is a slight delay in shifts at times especially when you reach near redline. In other words, it is best to let the computer handle the shifts when stretching the extremely tall gear cogs. The gearing is even tall enough to run 2nd gear all the way up to 75 mph… perfectly fine because the HEMI V8 has a wide power band.

The new sport mode feature, one of the few changes for the 2012 model year, is an essential part of keeping all 4,200+ pounds in check. Sport mode primarily stiffens up the dampers to levels that could almost rattle your teeth out of your mouth. To my surprise, sport mode turns the Challenger into a different animal, entirely changing its handling abilities. The difference in sport mode on or off is basically night and day. The rear end tends to sloppily flop around without the help of sport mode’s extra-stepped valve setting via the active dampened Bilstein shocks. Luckily, in the default non-sport mode, the Challenger SRT8 cooperates nicely on the highway serving as a nice touring machine with a ride similar to the Chrysler 300C or Dodge Charger R/T. Additionally, Sport mode holds the transmission in higher gears longer anticipating spirited driving. Expect to considerably lower the MPG figures from the EPA estimated 14 mpg city and 22 mpg highway to something well south of 13 mpg when in sport mode and having a heavy right-foot at the same time.

Automatic transmission equipped Challenger SRT8 models receive the Fuel Saver option, which uses intelligent cylinder deactivation where only 4-cylinders are fired under light loads. The computer, unfortunately, recognizes ‘light loads’ as nearly coasting or maintaining a constant speed on a perfectly level road. Cylinder deactivation is very noticeable as the exhaust note changes to a monotone hum and you take notice to a little extra vibration. Once all 8-cylinders kick back in, you hear an abrupt thump from the exhaust and the subtle vibrations from 4-cylinder mode tend to dissipate.

The 2012 Challenger SRT8’s interior remains mostly unchanged from last year except for the new flat-bottom steering wheel. The seats are well proportioned and bolstered just enough to comply with the Challenger’s handling capabilities. The padded dashboard and instrument cluster are specific to the Challenger while the center stack controls/buttons and touch-screen audio/connectivity LCD screen remains customary to older Chrysler/Dodge vehicles.

There is no denying that the Challenger is a big vehicle. If the highway-floating 4,200+ pounds of Detroit muscle does not give away its shear size, then the virtually endless proportions of front seating room will. Keep in mind, you can get 5 adults in the Challenger but at the expense of the middle rear-seat occupant ‘ridding the hump’ where the drive shaft runs to the limited-slip differential.

Lighting up the rear tires is virtually a cinch. Just lay into the right peddle and let the plumes of smoke build to your heart’s content, or at least until the rear 255/45 20-inch Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber ceases to exist.

The Dodge Challenger’s styling is definitely an eye turner. For those who remember the original Challenger, or maybe caught a few episodes of The Dukes of Hazard -mistaking the old Charger for a Challenger, will take pride in the Challenger’s exterior proportions and design lines. The SRT8 version of the Challenger takes things to an extreme level with 20-inch forged wheels, 4-piston Brembo caliper brakes up front with 2-pistion in the rear, an aggressive stance, black front splitter and a rear spoiler. To sum it up nicely, the 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 is simply bad ass looking. It is like an American heritage fest with unlimited beer and a city-wide ban on wine. No wimpy stuff here, just a HEMI-muscle gun show.

Pricing for the new 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI starts at a reasonable $43,995 but can easily tack on a couple grand from the short options list.

2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-3
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-1
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-2
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-side
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-angle
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-wheel-tire
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-fuel-door
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-hemi-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-badge
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-cluster
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-dashboard
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-front-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-rear-seats
2012-dodge-challenger-srt8-engine

Copyright: 2012 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Challenger SRT8 $43,995
  • Engine: 6.4-liter V8 HEMI 392 470 horsepower @ 6000 rpm / 470 ft-lbs. torque @ 4200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116.0in.
  • Total length: 197.7in.
  • Total width: 75.7in.
  • Total height: 57.1in.
  • Track: f/r-63.0/63.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4in.
  • Legroom: f/r-42.0/32.6in.
  • Cargo volume: 16.2cu.ft.
  • 0-60mph: 4.5 seconds
  • EPA mileage est.: 14 mpg city / 22 mpg highway (automatic transmission)
  • Fuel tank: 19.1 gallons
  • Curb weight: 4,203 lbs.


2011 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Review & Test Drive 11
Jul
Posted by Malcolm Hogan in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, featured, HEMI, Test Drives on 07 11th, 2011

The good ol’ American muscle car heritage lives on in modern-day conceptions of the old classics. One vehicle that carries the heritage proudly is the all-new 2011 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392 HEMI Inaugural Edition in Viper blue which is limited to only 1,492 units this year.

The new 2011 Dodge Challenger is one vehicle that does an excellent job in reintroducing an All-American classic. If you are old enough, then you can remember the old Challengers from the 70’s and how they put a staple in the history of American performance vehicles.  If you were to take a quick glance at the new Challenger from a reasonable distance, you could easily mistake it for a 70s classic, until the massive size of the new Challenger became noticeable.

Dodge has probably done the best job in the styling and reintroduction of an American classic muscle car when compared other retro-styled icons. My 2011 Challenger 392 embarks on the veiled 392-cu-in HEMI back in the day. The all-new Challenger 392 actually has 391.15 cubic-inches to be exact but who is going to complain when the displacement of the 6.4-liter HEMI V8 produces 470 horsepower and 470-ft-lbs. of torque.

The 6.1-liter Challenger SRT8 only produces 425 horsepower while the 392 Inaugural Edition pumps out an additional 45 horsepower and 90 more ft-lbs. of torque giving it a slight edge in straight-line performance. The new Challenger SRT8 392 exemplifies what enthusiasts wanted out of the 6.1-liter Challenger SRT8. The superfluous embellishments do not stop with just extra power. The new Challenger 392 has revised steering and improved suspension giving it the ability to score 0.93 lateral Gs on the skidpad.

On paper the performance stats seem decent, but being behind the wheel you do not feel as confident in hitting those numbers unless it involves lighting up the rear tires in large plumes of smoke. The new Challenger is undeniably large for even an iconic pony car.  Sure the Challenger 392 drives like it is a few hundred pounds lighter than the outgoing 2010 model year, but I would not put it up against a new Mustang GT in the twisties even with the extra Detroit muscle under the hood.

The new Challenger SRT8 392 Inaugural Edition begs for a conversation at the local gas station, or anywhere for that matter, giving others an opportunity to say something about its classic styling. The Challenger is already a good looking pony car but tricked out with the Challenger 392’s racing stripes, forged 20-inch SRT wheels and catchy blue-white leather seats, it’s sure to turn some heads.

The new Challenger SRT8 392 has an upgraded interior where most of the flash was put into the white and blue leather seats with blue “392” stitching. On the dashboard you will find the customary Chrysler/Dodge Uconnect system with integrated GPS Navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity, Bluetooth audio streaming, and a built-in 30GB hard drive all accessed through a bright 7-inch LCD touch-screen. The SRT instrument cluster features performance options to calculate times for 0-60 mph, ¼  mile, 1/8 mile, and braking distance. The pistol grip 6-speed shifter in my test vehicle allows you to short-shift through gears. The angle of the shifter does take a few minutes to get used to but you will find that it is very competent even for more experienced drivers.

The new Challenger 392 goes, strong. Rowing through the gears at wide-open throttle will leave you with a smile on your face. The smoke in the review mirror and invigorating rumble of the big 6.4-liter 392-cu-in HEMI V8 is icing on the cake.  What’s even better, if you are the eco-friendly type, is that the large HEMI is somewhat efficient partly due to cylinder deactivation at cruising speeds. The Challenger 392 gets an EPA estimated 14mpg in the city and 23mpg on the highway.

For about $1,300 more over the 425 horsepower Challenger SRT8, the 392 Inaugural Edition is easily attainable. In my book the 392 is well worth it especially considering the extra power, better handling, and head-turning looks inside and out. My test vehicles as-tested price came out to $47,565, which includes free massive clouds of burnout smoke until you have to replace the 255/45 20-inch Goodyear rear tires.

2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-2
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-rear
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-drive
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-spin
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-profile
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-rear-angle
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-dash
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-cluster
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-seats
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-wheel-tire
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-engine
2011-dodge-challenger-srt8-392-emblem

Copyright: 2011 AutomotiveAddicts.com

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Price: Base Challenger SRT8 $42,780 As-Tested 392 Inaugural Edition $47,565
  • Engine: 6.4-liter V8 HEMI 392 470 horsepower @ 6000 rpm / 470 ft-lbs. torque @ 4200 rpm
  • Wheelbase: 116.0in.
  • Total length: 197.7in.
  • Total width: 75.7in.
  • Total height: 57.1in.
  • Track: f/r-63.0/63.1in.
  • Headroom: f/r-39.3/37.4in.
  • Legroom: f/r-42.0/32.6in.
  • Cargo volume: 16.2cu.ft.
  • 0-60mph: 4.5 seconds
  • EPA mileage est.: 14 mpg city / 23 mpg highway
  • Fuel tank: 19.1 gallons
  • Curb weight: 4,203 lbs.


Jay Leno Drives The 2011 Challenger 392 25
Feb
Posted by Kurt Ernst in Automotive, Challenger 392, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, Jay Leno's Garage, video on 02 25th, 2011

The Green With Envy Challenger 392. Image: Jay Leno's Garage

When it comes to domestic cars, I’ve always been more of a Ford guy than anything else. I’ve never owned a Chevy, I’ve owned but one Plymouth (made by Mitsubishi), but I’ve owned four Fords. Despite this, I’ll admit to loving the lines of the Dodge Challenger, which is (in my mind, at least) the best looking of all the retro muscle cars. Like the Mustang, it tries to stay true to the early design, without adding the “contemporary styling flair” of the new Camaro. Unfortunately, like the Camaro, it’s just too damn big to be much fun on a racetrack. Or is it? A recent conversation with Dodge’s Ralph Gilles has me re-thinking that, and like Jay Leno I can’t wait to get behind the wheel of one. Take a look at the video below (which also features Gilles) and tell me you don’t want to go lay some rubber.

During a recent lunch presentation, Gilles said that the new Challenger “drives 1,000 pounds lighter” than the car actually is. I loved that comparison, because I instantly knew what he was talking about. The 2011 Mustang, for example, feels lighter than its curb weight of 3,605 pounds. The 2011 Camaro 2SS, on the other hand, feels a lot heavier than its 3,860 pounds. Could the suspension changes made to the Challenger have produced a car that’s livable for the occasional track day? I won’t know for sure until I drive one, but I suspect the answer is yes. I think the hot setup for track use will be the 5.7 liter Hemi version with the Super Track Pak suspension, even if it is down on horsepower from the 6.4 liter Hemi (called the 392). The smaller engine is about 100 pounds lighter, which should help with the cars balance. As soon as I get to test my theory, I’ll let you know.



Video: Richard Petty Signature Series Dodge Challenger In Jay Leno’s Garage 30
Nov
Posted by Larry in Automotive, Dodge, Dodge Challenger, Dodge Challenger SRT8, featured, Jay Leno, Jay Leno's Garage, Mopar, Richard Petty, video on 11 30th, 2010

The Mopar guys are going to love this! The Richard Petty guys have taken the Dodge Challenger SRT8 and supercharged it to the tune of 610 horsepower. They didn’t stop there with the upgrades in this ‘Signature Series’ package. It gets upgraded adjustable suspension, new wheels, Brembo brakes and other visual customization addons including a Nascar spoiler. This package will be offered to some lucky buyers in limited quantities.

Jay Leno invites Richard Petty to his garage to look over ‘his’ Challenger and then take it for a spin. I guess The King knows how to tune a car… Find out by watching the video below!

[source: Jay Leno’s Garage]







 Category



 Blogroll